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PsyD in Clinical Psychologynext

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Program Description

The Medaille College Clinical Psychology Program is a 99-credit program leading to a Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) degree in Clinical Psychology. The program is located at Medaille College’s Amherst Campus. The primary goal of the program is to educate and prepare students for careers as professional psychologists. The program follows the Practitioner-Scholar Model of the National Council of Schools and Programs in Professional Psychology and meets the requirements for licensure in New York.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) in Clinical Psychology Program is designed to educate and train students to function effectively in their eventual role as clinical psychologists. To ensure that students are prepared adequately, the curriculum provides for the meaningful integration of theory and research as applied to practice. The Clinical Psychology PsyD Program at Medaille College emphasizes the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes essential in the formation of professional psychologists who are committed to the ethical provision of quality services. Specific objectives of the program include the training of clinical psychologists to:

  • deliver effective diagnostic and therapeutic services to diverse populations of clients
  • apply the biological, psychological and sociological bases of human functioning to the provision of effective quality patient services
  • exercise leadership both in the healthcare delivery system and in the training of healthcare and mental health professionals
  • expand the role of psychologists within society
  • work effectively with other disciplines as part of a professional team

Competency Areas

  • Broad and General Knowledge
  • Assessment
  • Intervention
  • Diversity
  • Teaching and Supervision
  • Research
  • Ethics 

Delivery Format/Program Structure

Medaille’s PsyD program is offered in a daytime format with each 3-credit course meeting once a week for three hours during the Fall and Spring Semesters and for 6 hours a week during the Summer I Semester.  The PsyD in Clinical Psychology Program requires the successful completion of 99 semester credit hours distributed as follows:

  • Core course requirements (66 credit hours)
  • Elective requirements (18 credit hours)
  • Proseminar and practicum requirements (12 credit hours)
  • Clinical Dissertation Requirements (3 credit hours)
  • In addition to fulfilling these credit hour requirements, students must complete the Clinical Competence Examination and a one-year internship. 
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Admissions Requirements

Applicants must demonstrate a potential for success in graduate-level academic work, clinical work, and professionalism.  No preliminary or probationary admission is available.  In addition to the Graduate Application, applicants submit transcripts of all previous academic work, three doctoral reference forms with letters of recommendation, a curriculum vita, GRE scores (waived for applicants with 3.5 GPA in all previous work), and a personal essay.  Applicants selected for interviews will interview with at least two faculty members.  Please contact the Adult and Graduate Admissions Office for admissions procedures.   

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Program Prerequisites: Preliminary Foundation Work

Medaille College requires certain undergraduate courses of all students enrolling in the PsyD program.  These courses serve as a foundation for courses that will follow.  Students must have completed with a grade of “B” or higher a minimum of 15 credit hours of undergraduate psychology courses.  Within these 15 credit hours, the following courses must be included:

  • one course in abnormal psychology
  • one course in general psychology
  • one course in statistics or research methods 

These courses must be completed prior to admission or during the first semester of enrollment.  These foundation courses may be satisfied in one of the following ways:

  • all foundation courses must be completed successfully in the specific content area at a regionally accredited institution.
  • foundation courses may be completed through Medaille College, if the courses are offered.
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Course Plan and Requirements

First Year (30 credit hours)

Fall Semester (12 credit hours)

Spring Semester (12 credit hours)

PSY 700 Psychometrics (3)

PSY 763 Neuropsychological  Assessment (3)

PSY 701 Diagnostic Psychopathology (3)

PSY 720 History and Systems of Psychology (3)

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment (3)

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing (3)

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development (3)

PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment (3)

PSY 705 Professionalization Group (0)

PSY 705 Professionalization Group (0)

First Summer (Required) (6 credit hours)

PSY 731 Cognitive and Affective Processes (3)

PSY 765 Integrative Assessment (3)

Second Year (27 credit hours)

Fall Semester (12 credit hours)

Spring Semester (9 credit hours)

PSY 749 Physiological Psychology (3)

PSY 768 Research Methods (3)

PSY 761 Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations (3)

PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Treatment (3)

PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theories & Therapy (3)

PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II (3)

PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I (3)

 

Second Summer (Required) (6 credit hours)

PSY 735 Professional Ethics and Conduct (3)

PSY 782  Family Therapy (3)

                                                                                               

Third Year (22 credit hours)

Fall Semester (12 credit hours)

Spring Semester (9 credit hours)

PSY 769 Statistics (3)

PSY 794 Clinical Psychopharmacology (3)

PSY 780 Group Therapy (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV (3)

PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III (3)

 

Third Summer (Required)

Clinical Competency Exam

PSY 851 Clinical Dissertation  I (1)

Fourth Year (20 credit hours)

Fall Semester (10 credit hours)

Spring Semester (10 credit hours)

PSY 787 Social Psychology (3)

PSY 790 Administration, Consultation, and Supervision (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

Elective (3)

PSY 852 Clinical Dissertation II (1)

PSY 853 Clinical Dissertation III (1)

Fifth Year

PSY 900 Clinical Psychology Internship (No credit, 3 terms) 


 

 

 

Program Requirements

Core Course Requirements (66 Credits) | Students are required to take the following Core Courses:

PSY 705 Professionalization Group (0 credits)

PSY 701 Diagnostic Psychopathology (3 credits)     

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment (3 credits)

PSY 763 Neuropsychological Assessment (3 credits)

PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment (3 credits)        

PSY 720 History and Systems of Psychology (3 credits)

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development (3 credits)

PSY 731 Cognitive and Affective Processes (3 credits)

PSY 735 Professional Ethics and Conduct (3 credits)

PSY 749 Physiological Psychology (3 credits)

PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy (3 credits)

PSY 761 Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations (3 credits)

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing (3 credits)

PSY 765 Integrative Assessment (3 credits) 

PSY 768 Research Methods (3 credits)

PSY 769 Statistics (3 credits)

PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Treatment (3 credits)

PSY 780 Group Therapy (3 credits)

PSY 782 Family Therapy (3 credits)

PSY 794 Clinical Psychopharmacology (3 credits)

PSY 787 Social Psychology (3 credits)         

PSY 790 Administration, Consultation, and Supervision (3 credits)


Elective Requirements (18 Credits)

Students choose six elective courses in consultation with their advisor.  Electives can be combined to form a concentration.  Each student is encouraged to take enough elective courses to meet the requirements of at least one concentration, or to plan a series of electives that meets specific training goals with his or her advisor. 

Potential Elective Courses:

PSY 719 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology (3)

PSY 747 Trauma Through the Lifespan (3)

PSY 745 Proseminar V* (3)

PSY 746 Proseminar VI* (3)

PSY 762 Substance Abuse and Treatment (3)

PSY 771 Treatment and Assessment of Children & Adolescents (3)

PSY 778 Psychology of Women (3)

PSY 785 Advanced Family Therapy (3)

*= PSY 745 Proseminar V and PSY 746 Proseminar VI constitute a two-course sequence


PsyD Course Prerequisites:

Course

Prerequisites

PSY 763 Neuropsychological Assessment

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing

PSY701 Diagnostic Psychopathology

PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theories and Therapy

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development

PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Treatment

PSY 731 Cognitive and Affective Processes

PSY 765 Integrative Assessment

PSY 763 Neuropsychological Assessment

PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment

PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I

PSY 705 Professionalization Group

PSY701 Diagnostic Psychopathology           

PSY 763 Neuropsychological Assessment

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment

PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing

PSY 765 Integrative Assessment

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development

PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II

PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I

PSY 631 Professional Ethics and Conduct

PSY 705 Professionalization Group

PSY 768 Research Methods

Undergraduate Statistics OR Research Methods

PSY 769 Statistics

PSY 768 Research Methods

PSY 794 Clinical Psychopharmacology

PSY 749 Physiological Psychology

PSY 780 Group Therapy

PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Therapy

PSY 782 Family Therapy

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development

PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III

PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theories and Therapy

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing

PSY 735 Professional Ethics and Conduct

PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I

PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II

PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV

PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III        

PSY 790 Administration, Consultation & Supervision

PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV

PSY 745 Proseminar and Practicum V

PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum IV

PSY 850 Clinical Dissertation

PSY 768 Research Methods

PSY 900 Clinical Psychology Internship

Completion of 99 credit hours, CCE, All required coursework

Professionalization Group Requirements

The Professionalization Groups are advisement groups for first-year students.  These groups meet once a week for one hour and are led by a core faculty member, who will remain the students’ advisor until they identify dissertation advisors.  Students discuss topics related to professional psychology and the development of a professional identity.  The faculty member leading the group will help students with academic advisement, planning for field training, general consultation on problems or difficulties in the program, professional ethics as stated in the APA Ethical Guidelines for Psychologists, and questions emerging during the student’s first-year academic experience. 

Students are required to take the following:

  • PSY 705 Professionalization Group (0 credits) (two semesters in first year)
  • Proseminar and Practicum Requirements (12 Credits)

The Proseminar and Practicum requirements represent the first two of the three required levels of field training and evaluation in the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program.  The first level is the diagnostic practicum (Proseminar and Practicum I and II), while the second level is the therapy practicum (Proseminar and Practicum III and IV).  Doctoral students in the Clinical Psychology Program complete the diagnostic practicum in their second year of study and a therapy practicum in their third year of study. 

The practicum proseminar serves as an auxiliary training component in students’ clinical training.  The seminar instructor works with each student’s on-site supervisor to oversee education.  The seminar instructor is primarily responsible for evaluating student progress in consultation with the on-site supervisor.  Students are required to attend the seminar sessions and will be evaluated based on participation in seminar, work samples, and performance in all aspects of clinical and professional work on site.  Supervision of individual cases remains the responsibility of the on-site supervisor, who has direct contact with the practicum setting and with the clients.  In the proseminar, students receive didactic training, present their clinical work, and consult with peers and the seminar instructor regarding challenging assessment and treatment issues.  In keeping with the major objectives, students will:

  • demonstrate skills appropriate to their level of training in conceptualization and clinical service;
  • be exposed to a variety of clinical issues in different settings;
  • increase their capacity to generalize their clinical experiences across domains and groups; and
  • develop specific and global clinical competencies.

Students are required to take the following Proseminar and Practicum Courses:

  • PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I (3 credits)
  • PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II (3 credits)
  • PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III (3 credits)
  • PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV (3 credits)

Practicum Placement:  Students who are eligible for practicum for the following academic year will meet with the Director of Clinical Training in the Fall to gain an introduction to the practicum selection process and to explore the sites for the following year.  In consultation with his or her academic advisor, each student will develop a list of potential practicum sites in order of his or her preference.  All sites must be approved by the Director of Clinical Training.  The Director of Clinical Training will assign students placement interviews based on each student’s ranked list.  Although every effort will be made to help students obtain placement at a site that meets his or her training needs and goals, no particular site can be guaranteed.  See the Training Manual for a specific discussion on practicum procedures and requirements.

Practicum Eligibility:  The Director of Clinical Training has the authority to determine a student’s readiness for practicum.  In order for a student to apply for practicum or to begin practicum, he or she must be in good academic standing (GPA of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 and not on probation), and must complete all the practicum prerequisite courses prior to the beginning of the practicum.  If a student on practicum is placed on probation, the Director of Clinical Training will decide on a case-by-case basis whether practicum can be continued.  Students must demonstrate a readiness to assume a professional role and to interact appropriately with clients.  Personal adjustment issues, interpersonal difficulties, poor communication skills, or other behavioral problems may reflect on a student’s ability to interact with clients in a competent and ethical manner.  Students must have been in attendance in the Clinical Psychology Program at Medaille College for a minimum of two semesters before beginning practicum. 

Professional Liability Insurance:  All students enrolled in the Proseminar and Practicum courses must be covered by Professional Liability Insurance.  Students purchase this insurance through the American Psychological Association.  This is mandatory even if the student is otherwise insured.

Clinical Dissertation Requirements (3 Credits)

The Clinical Dissertation is a training experience designed to provide students with a guided opportunity for integrating findings from empirical research toward addressing a psychological issue.  The Clinical Dissertation must be a sophisticated piece of written scholarship that demonstrates the ability to frame and address a psychological issue.  The primary training goal of the Clinical Dissertation is to help students develop the skills needed to become critical consumers of the empirical literature in psychology.

Students are required to take the following:

  • PSY 851 Clinical Dissertation (1 Credit)
  • PSY 852 Clinical Dissertation (1 Credit)
  • PSY 853 Clinical Dissertation (1 Credit)

PSY 851, the first term of Clinical dissertation is a weekly seminar in which students work collaboratively to gain an orientation to the dissertation process, explore and refine potential topics and methods, identify individual dissertation advisors, and draft their proposals.   This seminar will meet in Summer I of the third year.  Students will select their dissertation Chairs during this term, based on faculty availability and expertise with the topic area.  See the syllabi for PSY 851, 852, and 853 for specific information about the dissertation project.

Students are expected to address a psychological issue from a theoretical and empirical standpoint.  The appropriateness of the project is determined by the Clinical Dissertation Chair and committee members, and is indicated by a potentially publishable review or a synthesis of findings that could be presented to professional psychologists in a conference or workshop setting.  The final Clinical Dissertation document must demonstrate the following:

  • a mastery of theoretical, clinical, and empirical literature relevant to the topic studied.
  • methodological and statistical knowledge relevant to the area of inquiry.
  • the ability to integrate specific research findings across studies and to synthesize information to support appropriate conclusions.
  • the ability to write clearly and concisely in the style adopted by the profession.

Each committee will consist of 3 members.  Chairs must be Medaille faculty members, but committee members may be appointed from the community at the discretion of the chair.  A list of available dissertation chairs will be provided.  Each student will meet with the Dissertation committee for a proposal meeting to develop a specific topic or project.  This is a working meeting during which the student may receive guidance about the appropriateness and acceptable scope of the dissertation.  All data-based projects must receive IRB approval.  In general, data-based projects should receive IRB review after the proposal meeting, but exceptions will be allowed at the discretion of the chair.  The defense of the dissertation will be open to the Medaille community and will involve a full presentation of the research, including questions about the project.  Students should submit all revisions to the chair (and other committee members as appropriate) within one semester of the final defense.

Dissertation Completion:  It is expected that a student will complete his or her dissertation within the 3 semesters allotted.  A student who does not complete his or her dissertation within 3 semesters will be required to register for PSY 854 Dissertation Extended.  This 1-credit course must be taken each Fall or Spring Semester until the dissertation is completed.  

Clinical Competence Examination Requirements

Students are required to take and successfully pass a Clinical Competence Examination (CCE) during the Summer Semester of their third year of coursework.  The CCE includes a treatment summary, a case presentation, a written case analysis, an oral presentation, and an oral examination based on the written and case presentations.  This format is designed to assess students’ knowledge, clinical reasoning within a conceptual model, technical skills, relationship skills, and ability to communicate in written and oral forms.  The CCE evaluates the student’s written and oral performance in the following areas:

  • Knowledge Base
  • Clinical Reasoning
  • Technical Skill
  • Relationship Skill
  • Formal Communication Skills

CCE Reports and Oral Presentations will be evaluated by the faculty to determine students’ clinical and academic competence and readiness for internship.  Students must demonstrate minimum competence in all areas to pass.  Results will include Pass with Distinction, Pass, Revise, and Fail.  

CCE Prerequisites: In addition to the prerequisite courses required for Proseminar and Practicum I – IV (PSY 741 – PSY 744), students are also required to complete the following courses before beginning the CCE:

  • PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III
  • PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV
  • PSY 768 Research Methods
  • PSY 769 Statistics
  • PSY 780 Group Therapy
  • PSY 782 Family Therapy
  • PSY 794 Clinical Psychopharmacology
  • Two Electives

Students who fail the CCE will be referred to the Student Development Committee to develop a remediation plan.  Remediation may include additional practicum experience and/or academic work.  Once the remediation is completed, the student may retake the exam once.  Re-examination cannot be scheduled before one full term has elapsed.  A student who fails the CCE twice will be academically dismissed from the program.  Students who are asked to revise their materials will have one month in which to complete the revision and will be given a Pass or Fail result upon evaluation of the revisions.

Appealing Clinical Competence Examination (CCE) Outcome 

A student who wishes to dispute her or his CCE Committee's decision has three levels of written appeal available:

1.      The chair of the CCE examination committee in consultation with the PsyD Program Director

2.      Head of the Division of Applied and Social Sciences

3.      Academic Affairs Office (see Medaille catalog at http://www.medaille.edu/academics/academic-course-catalogs/current-catalog )  

Internship Requirements

Students will complete an 1750-hour internship as a condition for graduation.  The internship is an integral component of the doctoral program and the final experience in the clinical training sequence.  During the internship, the student is expected to assume significant responsibilities and to perform major professional functions under the supervision of qualified psychologists.  Because the internship is typically the last step in the student’s preparation for functioning as an independent professional, the internship experience should provide the student with a variety of appropriate role models, as well as intensive and diverse opportunities to function in the various roles expected of a clinical psychologist.  Typically, full-time students begin the internship during their fifth year of enrollment.

The internship is intended to be a paid position.  Students are strongly encouraged to seek internships that are accredited by the Committee on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association (APA).  Students may not seek internships that are not active members of the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) without prior approval from the Director of Training, who will be responsible for reviewing the appropriateness of these internships based on standards in the field.  An internship that is not APA accredited must nevertheless meet guidelines used by the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology to define an internship http://www.nationalregister.org/internship_guidelines.html

Students are required to take the following: PSY 900 Clinical Psychology Internship

 

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Concentrations

The PsyD in Clinical Psychology Program does not require selection of concentrations.  For students who desire to follow a particular interest, two optional concentrations are offered.

  • Child & Family Psychology
  • General Adult Clinical

Child & Family Psychology Concentration

The Child & Family Concentration provides training in the assessment and treatment of children, adolescents, and families within a variety of settings and contexts with an emphasis on empirically supported methods.  In addition students will learn to promote and better understand healthy child and family development as well as the prevention of psychological problems of youth.  Additionally, specific treatment issues relating to children, adolescents, and families relative to individual and cultural differences are explored.  Students who complete the Child & Family Psychology Concentration will be able to:

  • apply concepts of normal development and developmental psychopathology to the understanding of children’s unfolding adaptive and maladaptive functioning, involving biological, behavioral, psychosocial, interpersonal, and sociocultural levels of analysis; and
  • design and implement interventions directed at the assessment and treatment of children, families, and other related systems.

Potential Electives:

  • PSY 719 Child & Adolescent Psychopathology (3)
  • PSY 747 Trauma Through the Lifespan (3)
  • PSY 771 Treatment and Assessment of Children & Adolescents (3)
  • PSY 785 Advanced Family Therapy (3)

General Adult Clinical Concentration

The General Adult Clinical Concentration allows students to explore the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of problems across the adult life span.  Students examine milder stress and adjustment problems of individuals, as well as more severe forms of psychopathology, as they gain advanced skills in psychotherapy and psychological assessment.  Theoretical and applied aspects of intervention are explored from multiple perspectives.  Additionally, specific treatment issues relating to individual and cultural differences are explored.  Students who complete the General Adult Clinical Concentration will be able to:

  • apply advanced skills in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of problems across the life span;
  • apply advanced skills in psychotherapy and psychological assessment to both milder stress and adjustment problems of individuals, as well as more severe forms of psychopathology; and
  • treat patients with a variety of presenting problems across the spectrum of social class, race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and other Individual and Cultural Differences.

Potential Electives:

PSY 762 Substance Abuse and Treatment (3)

PSY 778 Psychology of Women (3)

PSY 747 Trauma Through the Lifespan (3)

PSY 779 Geropsychology (3)

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Enrollment

Residency Experience:  All students are expected to be enrolled in the Program continuously for the duration of the planned program.  Attendance during summer semester is required in years one through three, and the Clinical Competence Examination is given during summer of year three.  Most internships are full time for 12 months, and therefore students will register for internship for Fall, Spring, and Summer terms. 

Full-Time Study:  Students taking 9 credit hours during Fall or Spring terms or registered for Internship or Dissertation are considered to be studying full time.  6 credit hours in Fall or Spring is considered half time.  Requests for less than full-time study must be approved by the Program Director.  Leaves of Absence must be approved by the student’s Academic Advisor and the Program Director by the second week of the term during which the student goes on leave.  Students returning from leave may be referred to the Student Development Committee (SDC) upon their return.

Attendance:  Attendance is a critical and mandatory part of your education and clinical training. In the event of a serious illness or family emergency that will result in an absence, students must immediately contact their instructor to notify him or her of their absence.  Students who miss a significant amount of class time and fail to contact their instructor in a timely manner and make up the work, or who do not have an excused absence, will be given an F for the course.

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Email Policy

Upon registration into the program, all students are given a Medaille College email address.  It is the student’s responsibility to check this account several times a week during semesters and class breaks. Important Program and College information will be sent to this address, (NOT to a personal email account). Students may decide to forward their Medaille email to a personal account. Students should contact helpdesk@medaille.edu or the IT Department on campus if they need assistance setting up their Medaille email account

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Emergency Notification System

In the event of a campus closing, general class cancellations, or other emergency situations, Medaille has implemented an emergency notification system that sends notifications through text messaging (SMS), email, and messages to cell and home phone numbers.  Students are required to keep their contact information up-to-date using a web form that will ask for the student ID number and Medaille email address.  The information collected through this site will be used by authorized College personnel in the event of weather-related campus/class cancellations or other situations where time is of the essence.  Test messages to all contact numbers within the system will be sent out once each semester. This information will not be used for any other purpose.  Specific instructions are available on the Medaille Website: Click here to add or to update your text/cell phone/SMS, email, home phone information

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Concerns or Questions About a Course or Program Requirement

In the event that a student has a concern or question about a course he or she is encouraged to consult the instructor of the course before bringing concerns to the Program Director.  If the situation is not resolved in consultation with the instructor, concerns and/or questions should be brought to the attention of the Faculty Advisor and then to the Program Director.  Further inquiries may be addressed by the Division Head as described in the Graduate Catalog.

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Student Advisement

Each student will meet with his or her faculty advisor weekly during the first year of the program during the professionalization group and a minimum of twice per term thereafter.  During the dissertation process, the dissertation advisor becomes the student’s academic advisor and will be in contact with the student at least once a month, but more often during many phases of the project.  Requests for change of advisor must be made in writing and approved by the Program Director.

Advisement activities will include, but will not be limited to, the following:

  • providing students with the best information and counsel on policies and processes of the College;
  • making students aware of the range of services and educational opportunities pertinent to their objectives;
  • assisting students in choosing educational, professional, and related life objectives that are well-suited to their interests and abilities;
  • making students aware that they carry the ultimate responsibility for acquainting themselves with academic and other College regulations, as well as for planning their courses in accordance with the published Program requirements, and other College policies and processes;
  • closely monitoring academic and clinical developments during all stages of progress throughout a student’s graduate career.

Semiannual Review:  Each student will be evaluated by the entire faculty twice annually, with written feedback given by the advisor.  Student’s progress toward developing levels of competence appropriate to each stage of training will be documented by faculty, supervisors, and academic advisors.  Students exhibiting difficulties may be referred to the faculty advisor at any time.  A student whose progress through the program may be in jeopardy will be referred to the Student Development Committee.  Although the semiannual meeting can be an opportunity for these referrals to emerge, referrals can be made at any time.  Students who perform at outstanding levels will be given commendations during one of the two semiannual meetings.  

Student Development Committee (SDC):  The SDC is charged with facilitating students’ acquisition of knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for functioning as competent professional psychologists.  Advisors and instructors will refer students as needed to the SDC to review and help develop remediation plans for students who are not progressing satisfactorily, and to determine students’ readiness to continue the program and/or progress to successive levels of training.  Academic, professional, and interpersonal performance will be considered based on the Clinical Program Comprehensive Evaluation Policy.  Recommendations of the SDC typically involve increased advisement and remedial academic or clinical work, but may include leaves of absence or recommendations for dismissal from the program.  These recommendations are subject to review by the Program Director and the Division Head.

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Academic Review/Probation/Dismissal

Repeating a Failed Course:  A student earning a grade lower than a B-, in any course or who earns a U in a pass-fail course is required to repeat the course.  A student may repeat any course in an effort to earn a higher grade.  Both grades will remain on the student’s official transcript and the latter grade will be used to compute the student’s GPA. 

Satisfactory Progress:  Students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0, and complete the program within seven (7) years after matriculation.  The Clinical Competence Examination must be passed by the end of the 5th year.

Maximum Time Frame Requirements: (without approved LOA):

  • Completion of the program in 7 years
  • Completion of all required coursework in 5 years
  • Completion of the CCE within 5 years.

Academic Warning:  Any student who makes a grade below B- will be issued an academic warning and referred for advisement; any student with borderline GPA, with a second grade below B-, or who is in danger of failing to complete the minimum number of semester hours for each year will be referred to the Student Development Committee (SDC).  These referrals will be made in hopes of helping students improve through active mentoring and exploration of options for developing more effectively. 

Academic Probation: A student who makes a grade of F in a graduate course or whose grade point average falls below 3.0 after completion of 9 credits will be placed on academic probation for the following semester.  Students on probation must maintain a GPA of 3.0 for each probationary term and must qualify for removal of probation by the end of the second Fall or Spring term. Students may be placed on probation based on review of the Student Development Committee (SDC) based on the Program Professionalism policy.  In these cases, students will be provided with a remediation plan with a time frame for completion.  The success of the completion of the plan will be determined by the Student Development Committee (SDC). 

Academic Dismissal:  A student who receives two grades below B- in one term or three grades below B- throughout his or her studies will be dismissed from graduate studies.  Grades of F in Pass/Fail courses or U in Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory courses are considered failing grades. Likewise, failure to come off academic probation within two regular (Fall or Spring) terms, failing the Clinical Competence Examination (CCE) twice, or failure to complete minimum time frame requirements (without approved LOA) will result in dismissal.  Students may also be dismissed for failure to fulfill terms of a remediation plan within the allotted time frame.  In cases of dismissal, students may petition the admissions committee for readmission after one calendar year.  Students will be readmitted to the program only in cases of extenuating circumstance IF they are judged to be able to complete the program successfully.

Academic Integrity:  Medaille’s faculty and administration expect all students to complete their academic assignments with honesty and integrity. Students who engage in any form of academic dishonesty (e.g., plagiarism, cheating on a test, forging a signature or an entire college document) will be dealt with severely, with penalties ranging from an F on a given assignment to failing a course or even academic dismissal from the program. It is important to note that the Graduate School at Medaille College interprets the submission of the same paper/assignment, or substantially the same paper/assignment, to more than one instructor to be a violation of this code. Students found guilty of such offenses risk dismissal from the College. 

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Professionalism

Comprehensive Evaluation Policy (adapted from The Comprehensive Evaluation of Student-Trainee Competence, Council of Chairs of Training Councils, CCTC): 

  • Faculty, training staff, supervisors, and administrators participating in doctoral level psychology training have a professional, ethical, and potentially legal obligation to: (a) establish criteria and methods through which aspects of competence other than, and in addition to, a student-trainee's knowledge or skills may be assessed (including, but not limited to, emotional stability and well-being, interpersonal skills, professional development, and personal fitness for practice); and, (b) ensure—insofar as possible—that the student-trainees who complete their programs are competent to manage future relationships (e.g., client, collegial, professional, public, scholarly, supervisory, teaching) in an effective and appropriate manner. Because of this commitment, and within the parameters of their administrative authority, professional psychology education and training programs, faculty, training staff, supervisors, and administrators strive not to advance, recommend, or graduate students or trainees with demonstrable problems (e.g., cognitive, emotional, psychological, interpersonal, technical, and ethical) that may interfere with professional competence to other programs, the profession, employers, or the public at large.
  • As such, faculty, and supervisors will evaluate students’ (a) interpersonal and professional competence (b) self-awareness, self-reflection, and self-evaluation ; (c) openness to processes of supervision; and (d) resolution of issues or problems that interfere with professional development or functioning in a satisfactory manner .
  • When a student’s conduct clearly and demonstrably (a) impacts the student’s performance, development, or functioning, (b) raises questions of an ethical nature, (c) represents a risk to public safety, or (d) damages the representation of psychology to the profession or public, the student will be referred to the Professional Development Committee. Students are required to abide by the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Guidelines and Standards and will sign an agreement upon admission. 
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Students with Disabilities

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, Medaille College does not discriminate on the basis of disability. The Office of Disability Services was created to assist students with disabilities in all aspects of college life. College personnel do as much as is reasonable to ensure that individuals with disabilities achieve independence and fully participate in the mainstream of the educational process in a comprehensively accessible environment. Students with disabilities are encouraged to contact the office of Disability Services for information about policies and procedures relevant to the Americans with Disabilities Act within the first week of the term.  Students are advised of their right that the self-disclosure and accommodation process be carried out as confidentially as possible.  Students are not required to discuss the reasons for accommodation with any other faculty or staff member of the institution.  In order for an accommodation plan to be implemented for a course, 1) The Office of Disability Services must provide the student with a statement that the student has submitted satisfactory documentation to qualify as disabled and 2) a student deemed qualified as disabled must meet with the instructor to discuss appropriate course-related accommodations.

Coordinator of Disability Services
Academic Support Center
(716) 880-2214

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Waiver of a Course Requirement

A maximum of 9 credit hours may be transferred into the PsyD program.  A Course Substitution Request must be submitted to the Program Director during the first academic year, and must include a course syllabus.  Students are encouraged to include copies of major assignments.  This request must be approved by the Registrar, the Program Director and the Division Head.  Courses that are have at least 80% overlap with that offered at Medaille will be accepted, at the discretion of the core faculty member who serves as coordinator for the course.

  • Courses must have been offered in psychology at the graduate level.
  • Courses must have been completed within five years of matriculation in the Program.
  • A grade of "B" or above must have been earned in the requested transfer courses.
  • The student may be subject to final examination in all coursework transferred into the PsyD Program.
  • No credit is granted for correspondence courses or for "credit-by-examination" courses.
  • Proseminar and Practicum, Internship, and Dissertation may not be waived.
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Rescheduling Classes in the Event of Inclement Weather

In the event that the College cancels one day out of the schedule due to inclement weather or other unforeseen circumstances, the Instructor will contact his or her students to inform them of how missed work/time will be made up.  Students are encouraged to sign up for weather closure notices at www.medaille.edu/alert

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Emergency Facilities Closure

In the case of an emergency facilities closure (i.e., due to natural disaster or pandemic flu), classes will continue online using Blackboard. The link for Blackboard courses can be found at www.medaille.edu and information regarding completing course requirements can be found on the class syllabus.

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PsyD in Clinical Psychology Course Descriptions

PSY 700 Psychometrics

This is the first course in the doctoral assessment sequence. Students will learn basic psychometric theory and principles of test construction as well as to gain an understanding of the process, methodology, and application of assessment. Ethical and professional considerations about assessment will be raised. Topics include: theories of psychological measurement, scale development, item analysis, item bias, reliability, validity, and test fairness. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 701 Diagnostic Psychopathology

This course focuses on the description, etiology, and diagnosis of psychological and personality disorders. Relevant clinical research relevant to the course is reviewed and used to enrich the theoretical basis. While the primary focus of this course is the DSM-IV diagnostic system, other systems of understanding may be considered. Discussion of the broad continuum of symptomatology encountered in clinical practice, and the unique personal experience that characterizes every clinical case, are included. This course will focus on the major psychological and personality disorders of the DSM IV-TR . Particular emphasis on the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, and prognosis of these disorders is placed. Empirically validated research is examined with emphasis on the influence of culture has on diagnosis, treatment and prognosis. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 705 Professionalization Group

This course serves as a discussion group for first year students. The scope of the course will include both personal and professional development and preparing for future careers in the psychology field. Professional ethics, including New York State Laws, Rules, and Regulations and the APA Ethical guidelines will be reviewed. The group sessions allow students to become comfortable with interacting with other psychology students in a professional environment. Group work will cover the study of clinical psychology, therapeutic work, and professional development. The group dynamic will be balanced with self-directed learning and personal evaluations; including values and desires leading to the study of psychology, interpersonal relationship, meaning and values, pathways to growth, and a more comprehensive understanding of a psychologist’s role in society. Furthermore, students will gain a solid understanding of the various roles of clinical psychologists. As part of this course, students will be required to complete the NY State Curriculum in Identification and Reporting of Child Abuse. Credits: 0 Prerequisites: None.

PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment

Theories, practices, and the development of cognitive assessment in children and adults provide the framework for this course. Students will familiarize themselves with the various types of assessments, how to identify appropriate assessments, and gain an understanding of the process, methodology, and application of assessment. Students will gain professional development via practice with written and oral reporting. In addition, ethical and professional considerations about cognitive assessment will be raised. The course will improve students’ awareness of how diversity and multiculturalism may affect assessment outcomes. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 711 Projective Personality Assessment (Elective)

This course introduces the Exner Comprehensive System for the Rorschach as well as selected projective tests in both theory and practice. The dual approach allows students to gain competence in administering, scoring, and interpreting projective tests, and master the theoretical fundamentals upon which the tests were developed. Students will further hone their professional skills through report writing, critical evaluation, interviewing, rapport building, and interpretation of data. Ethical and legal considerations within the scope of assessments will also be addressed. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment & PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment.

PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment

This course familiarizes students with objective personality assessment. Students will gain an understanding of the development and evolution of personality assessment—from its early history to current status. Emphasis on proper procedure, strategies for testing, and validity of testing will be covered. From here students will have the opportunity to practice the assessment process in labs designed to develop familiarity and competence in all aspects of the procedure—from initial stages through testing to evaluation and feedback. Students will develop their professional skills and learn about the variables associated with personality assessment, including demographics such as age, culture, gender, ethnic group, and marital status. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 719 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (Elective)

This course focuses on the development issues associated with children and adolescents. Students will be introduced to the stages of child and adolescent development as it relates to psychopathology. Students will learn to recognize the risk factors—social, behavioral, and affective—which may lead to psychological disorders. Emphasis will be placed on emotional and behavioral disorders—including risk factors, etiology, treatments, and case descriptions. These disorders will be defined and analyzed in order to suggest effective treatment routes. Credits: 3. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 720 History and Systems of Psychology

Major theories, frameworks, leading figures, and historical influences will be examined in relation to the current theories and practices of clinical psychology. From the early Greek philosophers to the modern debates between pure, scientific, and applied psychology—students will trace a line of progress leading to comprehensive understanding of psychology. The social, political, and scientific contexts that fostered the origins and development of psychology will be considered throughout. Problems in the development of psychology as a discipline will be examined with contrasting viewpoints and alternatives to accepted models and systems. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development

The stages and transitions in physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development across the lifespan will be studied. An emphasis on cross-cultural, gender, familial, and historical perspectives will be emphasized in relation to life span development. A focus on the interaction between genetic and environmental influences upon human development and an understanding of the development and influences affecting personal and interpersonal development will lend a greater depth to the analysis and understanding of life span development. Content areas include infant perception, attachment behavior, intelligence, cognitive development, moral development, and social interaction. In addition, the application of these topics to the practice of clinical psychology will be introduced throughout the course work. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 731 Cognitive and Affective Processes

This course provides an in-depth appreciation and thorough understanding of the current research models and theoretical frameworks in cognitive science. The curriculum explores both the cognitive and affective processes. Topics covered include; memory, attention, problem-solving, language, emotional states, and decision making. The translation from a theoretical knowledge-base to the clinical application of such information is emphasized. Students will gain not only a rich contextual background of “the cognitive revolution” but the ability to directly apply these theories and framing devices to their real-life, clinical experience. Major figures and key developments in the field will enrich the clinical experience and allow students to further delve into historical progress of Psychology. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 735 Professional Ethics and Conduct

This course aids students in understanding the obligation for the ethical and legal responsibilities, professional conduct, and the necessity to “do good and avoid harm” within the scope of assessment, therapy, forensics, and consultative and supervisory relationships. Using the APA’s Code of Ethics and New York State Law as a framework, this course focuses on understanding and development of the ethical decision making process, client privacy, modeling responsible behavior, and cultivating expertise as a professional psychologist. Attention will be placed on continuing professional development through ongoing supervision and upgrading professional skills. In addition, the unique challenges of group, family, and multi-cultural counseling issues will be addressed in relation to ethical and legal conduct. Credits: 3.0 Prerequisites: PSY 705: Professionalization Group.

PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I

The two years (four semesters) of practicum provide supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a practicum seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that either the first year of practicum experience (Practicum I and II) will focus on assessment issues and the second year on psychotherapy (Practicum III and IV), or that both assessment and intervention experience will be intermixed over the two years of practicum. Proseminar and Practicum I will provide students with the opportunity to develop their personal approach to therapy via thorough research and theoretical constructs. Legal, ethical, moral, and professional concerns will be considered. Students will gain valuable professional development —sensitivity & diversity training, consultation skills, interviewing skills, and evaluation methods will be taught and reviewed. Students will also have the opportunity to set and achieve their personal goals for professional development. New York State legislation on confidentiality will be addressed as well. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY705 Professionalization Group, PSY701 Diagnostic Psychopathology, PSY 763 Neuropsychohlogical Assessment, PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment, PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment, PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing, PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development.

PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II

The two years (four semesters) of practicum provide supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a practicum seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that either the first year of practicum experience (Practicum I and II) will focus on assessment issues and the second year on psychotherapy (Practicum III and IV), or that both assessment and intervention experience will be intermixed over the two years of practicum Proseminar and Practicum II will build upon the knowledge base from Proseminar and Practicum I. This course will provide more detailed and in-depth theoretical and empirical data. Topics will include evidence-based practices, applying current theory to practice, research methods for yourself and your client, analysis and assessment theory and practice, and assessment writing. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 741: Proseminar and Practicum I.

PSY 743 Proseminar and Practicum III

This practicum provides supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that practicum students will focus on their particular area of interest/specialty as well as their continued personal and professional development as an emerging psychologist. Feedback, group evaluation, and self-evaluation will provide participants with the opportunity to further hone their skills and gain new proficiencies. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy, PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing, PSY 735 Professional Ethics and Conduct, PSY 741 Proseminar and Practicum I, PSY 742 Proseminar and Practicum II, PSY 761 Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations, PSY 765 Integrative Assessment, PSY 768 Research Methods , PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Treatment.

PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV

This practicum provides supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that advanced practicum students will focus on their particular area of interest/specialty as well as their continued personal and professional development as an emerging psychologist. Feedback, group evaluation, and self-evaluation will provide participants with the opportunity to further hone their skills and gain new proficiencies. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 743: Proseminar and Practicum III.

PSY 745 Proseminar and Practicum V (Elective)

The advanced practicum provides supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a practicum seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that advanced practicum students will focus on their particular area of interest/specialty as well as their continued personal and professional development as an emerging psychologist. Both theoretical and practical concepts will be explored and used to further hone the specialized skill area of the student. Both personal and professional growth will be highlighted, as well as the continued development of professional policies and effective communication with clients. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 744: Proseminar and Practicum IV.

PSY 746 Proseminar and Practicum VI (Elective)

The advanced practicum provides supervised clinical field experience. In addition to the required hours working at the assigned training site, students enrolled in practicum meet weekly in a practicum seminar led by a core faculty member. The overall practicum experience may be structured such that advanced practicum students will focus on their particular area of interest/specialty as well as their continued personal and professional development as an emerging psychologist. Both theoretical and practical concepts will be explored and used to further hone the specialized skill area of the student. Both personal and professional growth will be highlighted, as well as the continued development of professional policies and effective communication with clients. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 745: Proseminar and Practicum V.

PSY 747 Trauma Throughout the Lifespan (Elective)

This course is designed as an introduction to psychological reaction and adjustment to sexual, physical, and emotional trauma. The various stages of emotional, physical, and social development will be taken into account at they relate to trauma. This course will address theoretical issues, assessment, diagnostic issues, and intervention strategies important for contemporary psychological practice. Some of the topics that will be covered included: assessment and treatment of child maltreatment and sexual abuse, treatment of adult survivors of sexual abuse, false memory controversy, date rape, domestic violence and immigration trauma. The course will address the multi-theoretical models of traumatic syndromes, and students will critique research in the areas of adjustment to trauma, diagnosis of trauma related disorders, and treatment of responses to trauma. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 749 Physiological Psychology

This course introduces students to the gross anatomy and the neurophysiology of the nervous system. Students are presented with updated data and findings regarding neurological functions as the foundations of human behavior. It presents an overview of endocrinological processes, adding more breadth to the purpose of this course, introducing students to the fundamentals of physiology behavior correlates. In addition, this course introduces students to the clinical ramifications of primitive reflexes and developmental undertones. This course provides an introduction to biological aspects of behavior. The topics include: biological bases of behavior, development, learning, memory, and abnormal psychology; the nervous system; processes of brain maturation; genetic influences; psychophysiology. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 758 Psychodynamic Theory and Therapy

The course provides an in-depth study of the major schools of psychodynamic theories including the work of Freud, Melanie Klein, the post-Klienians and Time Limited Dynamic Psychotherapy. Students will familiarize themselves with the methodology of each psychodynamic approach within a clinical setting. Classic psychoanalysis and contemporary theoretical approaches are covered, thus giving the students a historical perspective of the development and changes within the field of psychodynamic theories and therapy. Case formulation with a psychodynamic orientation and the application of psychodynamic interventions in psychotherapy are studied as well. In order for students to gain a hands-on appreciation of the theories, case material is used to increase working skills. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development.

PSY 761 Assessment and Treatment of Diverse Populations

The effect of diversity issues in the counseling relationship, outcomes, and service delivery will provide the focus of this course. This course is designed to increase student self-awareness of the importance of self-understanding and to explore the biases inherent in our social relationships. Personally and professionally, perceptions of others may affect our interactions with them. As psychologists, it is important to examine our own personal values systems and how these may enter into a counseling relationship. Students will promote culturally sensitive assessment and treatment of minority groups with diverse ethnic and racial populations, as well as, culturally-defined groups, such as: women and men, gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgendered people, people with disabilities, elders, and people with HIV disease. This course will provide students with an attentiveness towards and an appreciation of the diversity in our culture and how to interact in a professional and ethical manner. Students will learn and adhere to the American Psychological Association’s ethical codes. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 762 Substance Abuse and Treatment (Elective)

This course will provide theoretical and experiential training in the prevention, intervention, and treatment applicable to a heterogeneous substance abuse population. The foundations and psychology of substance abuse will be explored, as well as the clinical aspects of substance abuse. In addition, this course will focus on how substance abuse intersects with cultural and social demographics, as well as the role that gender plays in substance abuse. The various assessment tools and practices will be discussed, as well as the format for the evaluative process. Students will understand the intervention and recovery process for treating patients and their families with substance abuse issues. Finally, students will be able to identify the ethical and legal issues of working with this population. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 763 Neuropsychological Assessment

This course approaches neuropsychology by focusing on the relationship between the human brain and behavior, specifically developmental, systemic, neurological, and/or psychiatric issues. Students will gain in-depth knowledge of the scientific basis of normal and pathological human behavior as it relates to neuropyschology. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the testing and reporting schema of common neurological assessment tools and clinical issues relating to neuropsychological problems. Students will evaluate and suggest treatment options based on their assessments. In addition, special attention is given to the implications of assessment and treatment when working with diverse populations. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment.

PSY 764 Clinical Interviewing

Students will develop their self-awareness, interpersonal awareness and critical thinking in order to become more proficient clinical interviewers. They will learn the procedures and techniques for conducting a full clinical interview as part of an initial client assessment. Basic listening, interviewing, and strategic skills will be covered in order to maximize the effectiveness of clinical interviewing. Students will examine directive and nondirective approaches to interviewing. In addition, they will read and analyze theoretical and empirical literature relating to this topic. Demonstrations, role-playing, and structured exercises will allow students to practice and further hone their professional skills. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 701 Diagnostic Psychopathology.

PSY 765 Integrative Assessment

This course provides students with an in-depth study of integrative assessment. The theories behind integrative assessment and specific tests are covered. The course improves the students’ hand-on experience in administering, evaluating, and reporting assessments under supervision from an instructor. Students will begin by learning the nature of assessment in regards to treatment options. From here, professional communication skills will be honed as students learn the appropriate techniques and ethical guidelines for approaching and interviewing patients in order to select an assessment. Students will then learn the proper procedure for assessment, evaluating assessment, provided feed-back and evaluation to both clients and other professionals. Batteries submitted by students will involve integration of interview and assessment data across domains. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 763 Neuropsychohlogical Assessment, PSY 715 Objective Personality Assessment, PSY 710 Cognitive Assessment.

PSY 768 Research Methods

This course is the first in a two-course research sequence.  The course will focus on the problems and procedures of research sciences with emphasis on understanding the basic types of research, the development of sound research design, conducting an appropriate experiment, and utilization of an effective writing style for preparing and reporting research.  The importance and effects of diversity issues in research, and ethical issues in research are also covered. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: Undergraduate Statistics or Research Methods.

PSY 769 Statistics

This course is a continuation of Statistics and Research Methods I. Quantitative, multivariate approaches to systematic inquiry are covered along with additional skills needed for the completion of the proposed Clinical Research Project. These include qualitative approaches and literature review skills with an emphasis on the integration and synthesis of findings appropriate to a proposal that can be the basis of the CRP. The importance and effects of diversity issues in research, and ethical issues in research are also covered. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 768 Research Methods.

PSY 770 Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Treatment

Theoretical foundations and major cognitive-behavioral therapies are reviewed in this course. Professional skill development—including professional ethics, professional characteristics regarding the use of CBT, and value conflicts with clients—will be emphasized. They will also have the opportunity to design appropriate treatment plans. The theories, principles, and techniques of cognitive behavioral theory will be addressed. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 731 Cognitive and Affective Processes.

PSY 771 Treatment and Assessment of Children and Adolescents (Elective)

This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of commonly used assessment and treatment modalities utilized with children and adolescents who are experiencing social, behavioral or emotional problems. Emphasis on identifying “at risk” children and adolescents, and the development of prevention programs. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 778 Psychology of Women (Elective)

Female development will be studied in depth. Branches of development for the purposes of this course include personality developments, physical growth and change as it relates to psychology, and psychopathologies. Cultural and social distinctions will be explored as they link to the overall study of female development including relationships, pregnancy, health issues, and aging. Special attention will be placed on how gender may interact with issues such as sexual assault and abuse. In addition, students will explore the societal implications of “the feminine” and how such social strictures impact self-image and self-esteem. The class will utilize current and historical readings, lecture and group processes. Issues relevant to clinical practice, such as therapist gender, therapist pregnancy, transference problems and role conflicts are highlighted. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 779 Clinical Geropsychology (Elective)

This course is designed to provide students an introduction to issues and clinical practice with aging clients and their families. Personality and cognitive assessment will be discussed, with attention to particular instruments used with an elderly clientele. Therapeutic models, interventions, and issues relevant to elders and their caregivers will be explored. Relevant public policies will be reviewed in terms of their implications for the aging of the population. Society’s views of the elderly and the experience of minority elders will be explored. Credits: 3.0 Prerequisites: PSY 727 Lifespan Development.

PSY 780 Group Therapy

Operating within an ethical and professional rubric, this course introduces students to the fundamentals of theoretical and practical group psychotherapy sessions. Emphasis will be placed on both concepts and firsthand experiences of group therapy. In terms of theory, students will gain an understanding of the nature, function, major theoretical approaches, and the various stages of group therapy. In practice, students will apply their knowledge and skill set to various stages of client development, client populations, and therapeutic situations in therapy sessions. Students will receive feedback and evaluation from their group therapy practice session. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: PSY 770 Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and Treatment.

PSY 782 Family Therapy

Investigating the fundamentals in the field of family therapy and family systems, this course covers theoretical models and an integrative approach to marriage and family therapy. Students are introduced to family therapy concepts; perspectives of family therapy and its evolution including context and historical data, and basic models of family therapy. Students will learn the intricacies of family therapy and the diverse factors relating to successful therapy sessions. Building upon the theoretical frame-work, students will have the opportunity to gain practical, hands-on experience in therapy sessions developed to test and enrich their skills. Professional development including assessment, treatment plans, intervention & interactions, group dynamics, etc. will be integrated into the working model of family therapy. In addition, multi-cultural and social elements will be discussed in relation to their impact on family therapy. Credits: 3.0.Prerequisites: PSY 727 Psychology of Life Span Development.

PSY 785 Advanced Family Therapy (Elective)

An advanced theoretical and practical foundation for counseling individuals, couples, and families is emphasized. The course provides a survey of current skills and methods in work with individuals, couples, and families with an emphasis on integrating various systemic models of functioning and intervention. The emphasis is on an integration of assessment and therapeutic theory and technique through ongoing couple and family simulations. Supervision skills in family and couples treatment are a second major emphasis of this course. Credits: 3.0 Prerequisites: None.

PSY 787 Social Psychology

Students will be introduced to Social Psychology through a historical overview and the various methods used in its study. Topics covered include social perception, identity, social behavior, attitudes, conformity, discrimination, group dynamics, anger, helpful behaviors, and close relationships. Emphasis is placed on the major theoretical frameworks of social psychology and their application to the clinical population. Concepts from research and theory in social psychology are presented for the understanding of social influence on personality, human interaction, and behavior. Applications of social psychology to clinical settings are emphasized. Credits: 3.0. Prerequisites: None.

PSY 790 Administration, Consultation, and Supervision

The aim of this course is to provide students with an overview of theory, research, and practice models for administration, consultation, and supervision. Models and issues related to mental health and health services delivery, organizational structure and leadership, and clinical supervision and training are described and discussed. Students also discuss common strategies, modalities, issues and dilemmas in the multiple roles of psychologists. Credits: 3.0 Prerequisites: PSY 744 Proseminar and Practicum IV.

PSY 794 Clinical Psychopharmacology

Psychotropic drugs will be studied from a medical and a cultural point of view. Students will learn the history and development in drug taking behaviors and abuses from the nineteenth century to present—including expectations, effects, treatments, and cultural practices and differences. The differences between use, misuse, and abuse will be studied from a physical and psychological standpoint. Furthermore, psychotropic drugs used in the treatment of psychological disorders and their biochemical properties will be studied in-depth. Psychotropic drugs’ effects on the brain, their neurochemical basis and mechanism of action and their clinical application will be discussed. Principles of current use and the current status of psychopharmacology will be covered as well. A theoretical frame-work will be established to enable the student to understand the biochemical properties of psychotropic drugs. Credits: 3.0 Prerequisites: PSY 749: Physiological Psychology.

 

PSY 798 Special Topics in Psychology

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.

 

PSY 851 Clinical Dissertation I

This course is designed to enable students to successfully navigate through the dissertation process. Content areas include the various stages of the dissertation including the proposal, review of literature, methodology, measurement, data collection, selecting a committee and chairperson, and presenting and discussing the results with emphasis on validity and statistical recording. This course also provides feedback for students’ preliminary dissertation work. Credits: 1.0. Prerequisites: PSY 768 Statistics and Research Methods I.

PSY 852/853/854 Clinical Dissertation II, III, Extended

This course is designed to enable students to successfully navigate through the dissertation process. Content areas include the various stages of the dissertation including the proposal, review of literature, methodology, measurement, data collection, and presenting and discussing the results with emphasis on validity and statistical recording. This course also provides feedback for students’ dissertation work. Credits: 1.0. Prerequisites: PSY 850 Clinical Dissertation I.

PSY 900 Clinical Psychology Internship

The internship is an integral component of the doctoral program and the final experience in the clinical training sequence. During the internship, the student is expected to assume significant responsibilities and to perform major professional functions under the supervision of qualified psychologists. Because the internship is typically the last step in the student’s preparation for functioning as an independent professional, the internship experience should provide the student with a variety of appropriate role models, as well as intensive and diverse opportunities to function in the various roles expected of a clinical psychologist. Credits: 0. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 Credit Hours, All required coursework, 18 elective credits, Clinical Competence Examination, Endorsement of the Faculty.

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