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Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Biologynext

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BIO 101 BIOLOGY

An introduction to biological processes and principles including: (1) the nature of science, (2) origin of life and evolution, (3) the chemical basis of life, (4) cells and cellular events, (5) reproduction and genetics, (6) plant structure and function, and (7) ecosystems. Contemporary applications of these topics will be discussed. A laboratory will introduce students to the use of the scientific method by combining experiments, observations, measurements and analyses. Three credit hours. Offered Fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 101) and the lab (BIO 101 L) is required.

BIO 110 HUMAN NUTRITION

An introduction to human nutrition covering topics such as energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate requirements. Vitamin and mineral requirements and nutrition through the life cycle are also examined. Students apply nutrition concepts to their own diets. Three credit hours. Offered as needed.

BIO 120 BOTANY

A study of plant structure, physiology, and classification.  Fundamental concepts of genetics and evolution will be introduced.  Special emphasis will be placed on the ecological importance and economic value of plants.  Travel time to and from off-campus activities may be required. Number of Credits:  4. Prerequisites and/or Special Considerations: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 120) and the lab (BIO 120L) is necessary. BIO120 requires community-based learning field experiences and is a “U” course component of Medaille’s Project EQUIP curriculum (Understanding the place of your major in the greater community). Projects are chosen to benefit the Buffalo community while enhancing student knowledge, gaining experience in plant ecology and knowledge sharing with selected mentees.

BIO 150 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

An introduction to ecological theory, natural and man-made environmental problems and human population dynamics. The interaction of science and society in creating and solving environmental problems is emphasized. Students are challenged to question their own attitudes concerning man and nature. Three credit hours. Offered as needed.

BIO 160 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

This course initiates the study of the human body. Topics include cells, tissues, and the skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Four credit hours. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 160) and the lab (BIO 160 L) is required.

BIO 161 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

A continuation of BIO 160. Topics include the endocrine, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 160. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 161) and the lab (BIO 161 L) is required.

BIO 170 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I

A combination of lecture and laboratory exercises that provide an introduction to the major animal phyla and comparison of their life processes. Topics include cell structure and function, energy transformation, major body systems, genetics and behavior. Each of these topics is viewed from an evolutionary perspective to highlight the unity and diversity within the animal kingdom. Detailed study of mammalian anatomy, physiology, and histology is initiated. Prerequisite: None. Five credit hours. Offered fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 170) and the lab (BIO 170 L) is required.

BIO 171 COMPARATIVE ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II

A continuation of BIO 170. Exploration of mammalian anatomy, physiology, and histology are emphasized. A combination of lectures and laboratories to study both gross and microscopic anatomy. Models for examination are the dog, cat, horse, and cow. The animal is seen in its life processes and activities. The physiological aspects of the mammalian body are explored. Specific anatomical differences in other species are noted. Methods involved in the preparation of tissue slides for histological examination are introduced. Histological slides are part of the laboratory exercises. Five credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 170, minimum grade of C-. Offered spring semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 171) and the lab (BIO 171 L) is required.

BIO 200 MICROBIOLOGY

A survey of microscopic organisms including their morphology, nutrition, physiology, and interactions with humans and animals. Microorganisms surveyed include bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Laboratory exercises cover microscope techniques, slide preparation, cell staining, sterile techniques, and the identification of microorganisms. Principles of immunology and the inflammatory response are discussed. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 101 or BIO 170. Offered fall and spring semesters. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 200) and the lab (BIO 200 L) is required.

BIO 220 CELL BIOLOGY

The study of the biology of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Topics include the chemical composition and organization of cells, the function of organelles and cell specialization.  Cellular reproduction, regulation of gene expression and cell signaling will be emphasized. Number of Credits: 3. Prerequisites and/or Special Considerations: BIO 171, any college chemistry course, minimum grade of C- . Offered fall semester.

BIO 298 SPECIAL TOPIC IN BIOLOGY

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.

BIO 301 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND BIOSTATISTICS

This course provides an introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical techniques using computer statistical software.  Topics such as hypothesis testing and interpretation of data from health, behavior, ecological and epidemiologic research will be covered.  The course will also review the methods used in epidemiologic research, including the calculation of rates, sampling theory, and types of studies.  Credit Hours: 3. Prerequisites: BIO 161 or BIO 171 and MAT 110.

BIO 303 TOXICOLOGY

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of toxicology. Topics include the history and scope of toxicology, the mechanisms of toxicity, and risk assessment. Depending upon the specialized areas of interest of the instructor, students are also introduced to broader subjects in the discipline such as environmental toxicology, clinical toxicology, and forensic toxicology. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 161 or 171 and any College-level chemistry course. Offered as needed.

BIO 310 IMMUNOLOGY

The course is designed to provide students with in-depth knowledge of the current principles of immunology. Both humoral and cellular immune responses will be examined in terms of the cells involved and the method in which the cells recognize and react to foreign antigens. Several disease states that are controlled by host immunity will also be included. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 200 and any College-level chemistry course. Offered as needed.

BIO 320 ECOLOGY

The study of the relationships of organisms to their environment. Topics include the ecology of individual organisms as well as population, community, and ecosystem ecology. Application of ecological principles to issues of environmental concern such as pollution, conservation, and land use will be considered. Additional student time outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours may be required for assignments and/or travel to and from off-campus activities. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: Any College-level biology course. Offered fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 320) and the lab (BIO 320 L) is required.

BIO 330 GENETICS

A study of the fundamental concepts of transmission, molecular and population genetics. Mendelian principles and their applications are explored; the chemical and physical structure of chromosomes, genetic linkage and mapping are included. Expression of genetic material, chromosomal organization, mutations and mechanisms of recombination are discussed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Any college-level biology and any college-level chemistry course, minimum grade of C-. Offered spring semester.

BIO 340 ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

This course covers the natural behavior of animals, providing a broad examination of genetic, neural, developmental, ecological, social and evolutionary aspects of behavior. Specific discussion will focus on sexual and parental behavior, migration, communication and aggression and learning. Summarization will address behavior problems, methods of intervention and solutions pertaining to companion and farm animals. An outside field trip is required. Comparative studies will be used for helping to understand human behavior. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Any College-level biology course. Offered as needed.

BIO 370 ADVANCED VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY I

An investigation into comparative vertebrate physiology of the nervous, muscular, hematologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and excretory systems as they relate to environmental adaptation, health and disease states. Analysis of organ system physiology in whole animal survival is emphasized. Number of Credits: 3. Prerequisites and/or Special Considerations: BIO 171, minimum grade of C-. Offered as needed.

BIO 371 ADVANCED VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY II

An investigation into comparative vertebrate physiology of the digestive, reproductive and endocrine systems as they relate to environmental adaptation, health and disease states. Thermoregulatory mechanisms are explored. Analysis of organ system physiology in whole animal survival is emphasized. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171 or equivalent. Offered as needed.

BIO 421 ICHTHYOLOGY

This course is an exploration of the taxonomy and biological characteristics of fish, including their anatomy and physiology, life history, ecology and distribution. The relationship of fishes to man will be examined. The laboratory will include identification of native and exotic species, surface and internal anatomy, and field trips to examine specimens in their natural and/or captive environments. Special emphasis is placed on the identification and life history of native New York fauna. Field trips may require time outside of normally scheduled class and/or lab. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171, BIO 301, and BIO 320. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 421) and the lab (BIO 421 L) is required.

BIO 422 HERPETOLOGY

This course is an exploration of the taxonomy and biological characteristics of reptiles and amphibians, including their anatomy and physiology, life history, ecology and distribution. The relationship of herptiles to man will be examined. The laboratory will include identification of native and exotic species, surface and internal anatomy, and field trips to examine specimens in their natural and/or captive environments. Special emphasis is placed on the identification and life history of native New York fauna. Field trips may require time outside of normally scheduled class and/or lab. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171, BIO 301, and BIO 320. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 422) and the lab (BIO 422 L) is required.

BIO 423 ORNITHOLOGY

This course is an exploration of the taxonomy and biological characteristics of birds, including their anatomy and physiology, life history, ecology and distribution. The relationship of avians to man will be examined. The laboratory will include identification of native and exotic species, surface and internal anatomy, and field trips to examine specimens in their natural and/or captive environments. Special emphasis is placed on the identification and life history of native New York fauna. Field trips may require time outside of normally scheduled class and/or lab. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171, BIO 301, and BIO 320. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 423) and the lab (BIO 423 L) is required.

BIO 424 MAMMALOGY

This course is an exploration of the taxonomy and biological characteristics of mammals, including their anatomy and physiology, life history, ecology and distribution. The relationship of mammals to man will be examined. The laboratory will include identification of native and exotic species, surface and internal anatomy, and field trips to examine specimens in their natural and/or captive environments. Special emphasis is placed on the identification and life history of native New York fauna. Field trips may require time outside of normally scheduled class and/or lab. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171, BIO 301, and BIO 320. Offered as needed. Note: Registration for both the lecture (BIO 424) and the lab (BIO 424 L) is required.

BIO 430 ORGANIC EVOLUTION

This course will explore the evolutionary process in detail and will address the rationale underlying evolutionary theory. Topics include the evidence for evolution, the mechanisms of evolutionary change, the measurement of evolutionary change, speciation and the analysis of phylogeny. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171, BIO 330, MAT 114 (or equivalent), and any College-level chemistry course. Offered as needed.

BIO 470 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

An intensive examination of developmental biology from both the classical and contemporary perspectives. Topics include fundamental concepts such as nuclear totipotency, cell determination, induction, and morphogenesis interspersed with modern genetic and molecular analyses of development. Current issues in developmental biology will also be addressed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 220 and BIO 330. Offered as needed.

BIO 498 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN BIOLOGY

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.