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Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Englishnext

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NOTE: All new students entering the College are required to take ENG 100/ENG 101, ENG 110/ENG 111, and ENG 200/ENG 201 within their first 45 credits at Medaille College. Transfer students with more than 45 credits already completed should complete these courses as soon as possible.

ENG 100 FUNDAMENTALS OF COLLEGE WRITING

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of college writing. The course specifically addresses the following: pre-writing, writing, revising, and editing; paragraph and essay organization; introductory research and documentation skills; the importance of critical thinking, clarity, and conciseness in writing; grammar; in-class writing; audience and purpose. Three credit hours. This course is required for all students who place within the specified range on the placement test. Offered fall and spring semesters.

ENG 102 COLLEGE WRITING I FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS & SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION

This course is the equivalent to ENG 100: College Writing I, but it is designed to introduce ESL and EFL students to American culture, both within and beyond the academy. As with ENG 100, ENG 102 increases students’ abilities to communicate confidently with others, to think clearly, and to organize ideas in a manner that will lead to success in other courses taught in English. Students will gain practice with sentence, paragraph, and ultimately essay construction in English. The process approach to writing (Pre-writing, drafting, revising and editing) will be introduced.) Students will also develop strategies for reading and interacting with published texts.  Students will receive ongoing instruction in English grammar mechanics, while also being introduced to American academic traditions. Students will be required to attend 2-3 hours of supplemental tutorial per week registered for this course. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Placement by testing.

ENG 110 COLLEGE WRITING

This course develops students’ abilities to write effectively in College. It assists students to make judgments regarding content within their own writing, particularly when utilizing researched sources. It also emphasizes organization, structure, revision, and mechanics. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment and are expected to retrieve these from the division secretary at the end of the semester for use in ENG 200. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 100 or suitable score on the writing assessment. Offered fall and spring semesters.

ENG 112 COLLEGE WRITING for students of english as a second language and SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION

This course is the equivalent of ENG 110, with modifications to meet the needs of ESL and EFL students. This course introduces the students to U. S. academic writing practices and develops the students' abilities to write effectively in college. It assists students to make judgments regarding content within their own writing, particularly when utilizing researched sources. Students will be introduced to accepted modes of citing sources in the United States. It also emphasizes organization, structure, revision, and mechanics. The course will further the students' grasp of English grammar, style, and vocabulary. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment and are expected to retrieve these from the division secretary at the end of the semester for use in ENG 201. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 101 or its equivalent.

ENG 200 ADVANCED COLLEGE WRITING

This course develops students' skills in critical thinking and in writing analyses using subject matter from across the curriculum. Each writing assignment requires research and writing from sources. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or its equivalent in transfer credits. Offered fall and spring semesters.

ENG 202 ADVANCED COLLEGE WRITING FOR ESL STUDENTS & SUPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION

This course is designed to follow ENG 111, and it is the equivalent of ENG 200: Advanced College Writing, with additional support for the ESL/EFL student. It develops students' skills in critical thinking and in writing analyses, using subject matter from across the curriculum.  Each writing assignment requires research and writing from sources. Students will produce a portfolio of their written work, including a self-assessment.  If the student is in a four-year degree program that they intend to complete at Medaille, they are expected to retrieve these portfolios from the divisional secretary at the end of the semester for use in their capstone projects in GEN 410.  The course will also further address each individual students’ needs, in terms of grammar, style, vocabulary, and other ELL needs. Students are required to attend a weekly one hour supplemental while in this course.  In some cases, students will be required to attend individual tutorial sessions, as well. Three credit hours. Prerequisites and/or Special Considerations:  ENG 111 or its equivalent from another accredited American university or college.  Each student is required to complete a one-hour supplemental session, led by a tutor/mentor.   Some students may be required to attend additional hours of tutoring each week in the Academic Skills Center. 

ENG 205 INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE

This course introduces students to the basic literary forms, techniques and processes used in poetry, drama and the short story, as well as to some of their classical origins. In addition to selections from European and American literature, students will read selected classical and religious texts that have contributed to the development of Western Literature. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: none. Offered fall and spring semesters. Please note: ENG 205 has been identified as a U course in the EQUIP curriculum sequence. This course is designed to help students understand their academic discipline within the context of the broader community, region, and the world.  ENG 205 considers the potential of the discipline and its methodology to contribute to a civic and sustainable future.

ENG 210 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING

This course introduces students to the tools and techniques needed to compose different types of creative writing, including fiction, poetry, drama and, at the discretion of the instructor, perhaps one other genre such as creative non-fiction or the personal essay. This course also is designed to help students learn how to express idea, emotion, and other experiences in language through traditional, contemporary, and experimental forms of stories, poems, plays, and essays. This course also will help build students’ confidence in the oral performance of their creative writing and provide them knowledge about how to publish their own work. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: GEN 110. Offered spring semester.

ENG 215 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD LITERATURE

This survey course is designed to introduce students to representative works (short stories, poems and plays) of world literature. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: none. Offered spring semester.

ENG 260 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WRITING

This course examines the different types of business and professional writing, both traditional and electronic, as well as oral communications in various cultural settings.  Students shall learn how to most effectively use basic grammar skills and usage in a variety of business and professional applications.  They will also learn the proper use of graphs, visuals, and presentation materials as they relate to written; both print and online, and oral communication. This course investigates the necessary relationships between audiences, styles of writing, and ethical considerations pertinent to business and professional communications. Students will produce a print and/or online portfolio which will include a resume, application letters, memoranda, reports, instructions, and brochures. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201. Offered spring semester.

ENG 270 ARGUMENTATION AND PERSUASION

This course offers a detailed study of the principles employed in effective written arguments and persuasive pieces. The course will familiarize students with the tools and techniques of persuasion, and place special emphasis on the nature of argument. Practical application of the art of persuasion in the professional world will be included. The course will provide extensive writing practice. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201 and PHI 200. Offered as needed.

ENG 298 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH

Topic specified each semester course offered. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201 or higher. Offered as needed.

ENG 300 FICTION WORKSHOP

This course helps the student to focus his/her creative ideas and thoughts and write short pieces of fiction with a view toward entering contests, freelancing his/her work and other areas of publication. The student through actual writing of short stories will come to a better awareness and appreciation of the short story as an art form. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201. Offered fall semester.

ENG 305 BRITISH LITERATURE: MIDDLE AGES TO THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

This course surveys selected major authors from the Middle Ages through the Restoration and early 18th century. Emphasis of the course is on major authors, the historical contexts of literary production and reception, and the historical development of the English language. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered fall semester.

ENG 310 POETRY WORKSHOP

This course is designed to introduce the student to the tools and techniques needed for writing poetry. It is a course in the creative expression of thought and idea combined with the discipline of learning traditional, contemporary, and experimental forms of poetry. It is also designed to give the student confidence in oral reading of poetry and knowledge of how to publish. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201. Offered spring semester.

ENG 315 BRITISH LITERATURE: LATE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY THROUGH THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This course surveys selected major authors from the Romantic Period through the 20th century. Emphasis of the course is both on major authors and the historical development of literary traditions. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered spring semester.

ENG 320 DRAMA WORKSHOP

This course will provide a practical introduction to writing for the stage. It will include a study of dramatic structure, character, themes, and theatrical devices. Through experiential activities, students will gain an appreciation for issues such as the effective use of space, movement, light, dialogue, and sound. Students will write exercises or short scenes every week, and that writing will become the basis of a one-act play, which will be the final project. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201. Offered fall semester.

ENG 325 AMERICAN LITERATURE: COLONIAL TO THE CIVIL WAR

This course is an intensive critical study of American literature beginning with texts of the New World exploration and settlement up until the Civil War, inclusive of Native American oral literature. Emphasis in the course is on both individual works and literary/historical traditions. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered fall semester.

ENG 330 PRELUDE PRACTICUM

A course designed to introduce students to the tools and strategies needed to complete both the desktop and online publication of the Prelude, Medaille’s creative arts journal. This course will help students learn how to work together with others to obtain submissions for publication, set up editorial criteria for selection of submissions, notify authors about selection or rejection of their submissions, and create a story board for format and layout of the journal.  This course also will help students learn how to edit and organize selected copy; learn how to use desk top publishing software to format, layout, and publish a hard copy book of poems, stories, and visual art, as well as to create and maintain a website for online publication of the Medaille creative arts journal. Moreover, students will learn how to organize, publicize, and implement campus and community readings or other events to encourage more interest in and support for the Prelude. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 110.

ENG 331 PRELUDE PRACTICUM II

This course helps students master the tools and strategies needed to complete desktop publication of the Prelude, as well as a web site. This course also is designed to help students learn how to edit and organize copy, as well as how to use desktop publishing software to format and layout a book of poems, stories, and visual art. The course also helps students master the software skills necessary to build a web-related materials for the Prelude. One and a half credit hours (1.5). Prerequisites: ENG 330. Offered spring semester.

ENG 335 AMERICAN LITERATURE: CIVIL WAR THROUGH THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

This course is an intensive critical study of American literature from the start of the Civil War through the 20th century, emphasizing both individual works and literary/historical traditions. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered spring semester.

ENG 345 FILM ART AND APPRECIATION

This course explores the development of film as an art form in its historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students learn to become active viewers of film through analysis of film technique, genre, and theory. Special emphasis is placed on the connections between cinematic “language” and the world of literature: not only because film and literature are closely linked in their use of narrative, but also because methods of literary analysis provide a useful avenue into film analysis. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Any 200 ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered as needed.

ENG 355 MAJOR LITERARY FORMS

This courses studies one of the important forms of literature: drama, short story, novel, or poetry using representative examples. The course will include the history and development of the form as well as its nature and variety. A student may take the course more than once for credit under different literary forms. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered fall semester.

ENG 360 ADVANCED REPORT AND PROPOSAL WRITING

This course teaches advanced critical thinking and writing skills for application in various academic disciplines and professional contexts. Students also learn how most effectively to produce professional and academic discipline specific texts that are print-ready, coherent, and cohesive. Students produce a portfolio in both print and web-based media that will include an advanced research report and a proposal. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200 or ENG 201. Offered spring semester.

ENG 365 ETHNIC LITERATURE IN AMERICA

This course analyzes the literature of selected minority groups. The course will focus on the literature of African-Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics, and Jews. It will cover the cultural and historical heritage expressed through the literature as the vision of the minority experience in America and the more universal nature of the human condition. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Any ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered spring semester.

ENG 370 TEACHING AND EVALUATING WRITING

This course is a study of modern approaches to the teaching of writing, emphasizing writing for practice, responding to writing, and developing practical tools for secondary school writing instruction. Coursework will include holistic scoring and portfolio evaluation. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: EDU 200, EDU 233 or EDU 234. Offered as needed.

ENG 375 Children's Literature: From Ancient Myth to the Digital Age

This course is a study of children’s (birth through adolescence) literature and media from a broad range of cultures, periods, and genres. The course will examine the history, the development, and the reception of children’s literature and media.  A community-based learning project will provide an opportunity for students to understand and apply children’s literature in real-world, multicultural contexts. Offered as needed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites and/or Special Considerations: GEN110; ENG 200/201; a 200-level literature course. Please note: ENG 375 has been identified as a U course in the EQUIP curriculum sequence. This course is designed to help students understand their academic discipline within the context of the broader community, region, and the world.  ENG 200 considers the potential of the discipline and its methodology to contribute to a civic and sustainable future.

ENG 398 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH

Topic specified in each semester course offered. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/ENG 201 or higher. Offered as needed.

ENG 400 SENIOR PORTFOLIO

In this workshop, students with previous experience in writing for business, technical writing, and/or creative writing, learn how to write for publication. The class employs a workshop approach, whereby students are exposed to all types of writing and publication issues, while themselves choosing one area of writing in which to focus on publication. Students learn what manuscripts should look like, how to professionally submit them for publication, and how to identify markets and submit to Internet publications. They will also learn about the business of publishing, about grants and contests, self-publishing options, and how to use revision to turn manuscripts into finished products. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Any writing course 260 or above. Offered spring semester.

ENG 405 THEMES AND TOPICS IN AMERICAN LITERATURE

This course analyzes selected themes or topics from American literature. A student may take this course more than once for credit under different themes/topics. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered spring semester.

ENG 415 THEMES AND TOPICS IN BRITISH LITERATURE

This course provides an in-depth study of a specific theme or topic from British literature. A student may take this course more than once for credit under different themes/topics. Three credit hours. ENG 205 or ENG 215.Offered fall semester.

ENG 425 THEMES AND TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURE

This course explores a significant theme or topic reflected in major literary works and/or authors from world literature. A student may take this course more than once for credit under different themes/topics. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered spring semester.

ENG 435 MAJOR LITERARY FIGURES

This course provides an intensive study of the works of a major writer or a highly limited number of related authors. A student may take this course more than once for credit under different literary figures. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 205 or ENG 215. Offered fall semester.

ENG 460 LITERARY THEORY AND CRITICISM: ENGLISH SEMINAR

This course considers the history of literary theory and criticism from New Criticism through contemporary theoretical developments. Over the course of the semester, students will apply theoretical approaches to the analysis of literary works and other forms of creative expression. Students will also explore the relationship of literary theory and criticism to the construction and revision of literary canons. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: This course is restricted to English and Adolescent Education majors. Other majors may enroll with special approval from division head. Offered fall semester.

ENG 477 ENGLISH FIELD EXPERIENCE

This internship course offers students a structured, supervised opportunity to design their own learning within the context of their program’s expectations, goals and objectives for enhancing students’ academic and professional development and the needs of their host organization. In this field experience, students gain experience working with a local publication or in some other writing-based career employer. Skills practiced in the field experience are expected to be at a high-level of competence and difficulty and approved by the division head. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 250. Offered fall and spring semesters.

ENG 478 English Field Experience 

This internship course offers students a structured, supervised opportunity to design their own learning within the context of their program’s expectations, goals and objectives for enhancing students’ academic and professional development and the needs of their host organization. In this field experience, students gain experience working with a local publication or in some other writing-based career employer. Skills practiced in the field experience are expected to be at a high-level of competence and difficulty and approved by division head. This is intended as a second internship semester for students who have taken ENG 477. Three credit hours. Prerequisite: ENG 477. Offered as needed.

ENG 485 The English Language: Past, Present & Future

Consideration of major social, historical, and geographic factors influencing the origin and development of English; sound, meaning, and grammatical elements of the language; differences between American and British English (as well as other global variations); attitudes toward language and language differences.  In addition, this course will consider the impact that globalization and technology have had on the English language, and the implications for its future growth.  The course will culminate with each student contributing to a digital humanities project, such as an article or other digital feature to an evolving website on some aspect of the development, future, structure or influence of the English language. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 200/201; junior standing.

ENG 498 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ENGLISH

Topic developed by student and instructor for each semester offered. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: ENG 260 or above. Offered as needed.