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Undergraduate Course Descriptions: Veterinary Technologynext

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VET 100 INTRODUCTION TO VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

The student is introduced to the Medaille facilities, expectations of the Veterinary Technology Program, medical terminology and basic scientific concepts. Discussions are generated on career opportunities, the role of the veterinary technician in veterinary medicine, and the human-animal bond. The different classifications and breeds of companion and farm animals are studied. General principles of animal behavior, care, equipment and management are presented. Legal regulations on the county, state and federal levels are examined. There will be a preliminary investigation of the concepts of health and disease. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Restricted to Veterinary Technology majors. Offered fall and spring semesters.

VET 120 INTRODUCTION TO LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE

A general overview of the field of laboratory animal science is covered. Humane handling, care and ethical use of laboratory animals are emphasized. Taxonomic classification and comparative anatomic and physiologic characteristics of each species are mentioned. Laws, regulations, standards and organizations promoting responsible lab animal management are discussed. The use of alternatives to animals for research is explored. Basic handling, restraint and performing common procedures on small mammals are practiced in the laboratory portion of the course. Recognition of health and disease through the animal care rotation (vivarium) is an important aspect of this course. Note: The animal care rotation will require additional time besides scheduled class and laboratory hours for vivarium duty. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Permission of the Veterinary Technology Chairperson. Students MUST obtain a minimum grade of C- in order to pass the course. Offered fall and spring semesters. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 120) and the lab (VET 120 L) is required.

VET 126 ANIMAL PARASITOLOGY

This course focuses on the common ectoparasites and endoparasites of pets and large animals and laboratory animals. Parasite identification, life history and pathogenesis are studied. Public health aspects are noted and methods of prevention and treatment are discussed. Diagnostic procedures and identification are performed in the laboratory. Two credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100; restricted to VET majors. Offered spring or fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 126) and the lab (VET 126 L) is required.

VET 130 BASIC INTRODUCTION TO HORSES

The student is introduced to methods of handling and restraint of the horse: basic equine terminology including basic anatomy, breed identification, color and color patterns and equipment, and different disciplines of horseback riding. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: none. Offered as needed.

VET 177 PRECEPTORSHIP I

Each students spends 60 hours observing at an animal facility in the areas of surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory and general facility operations. The primary objective is to introduce concepts by seeing examples of actual cases. The student becomes more familiar with and appreciates the scope of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Two credit hours. Prerequisites: 2.0 cumulative average, unless taken in the first semester at college, restricted to Veterinary Technology majors. Offered fall and spring semesters.

VET 202 SMALL ANIMAL DISEASES AND NUTRITION

Emphasis is placed on the dog and cat regarding proper restraint and care.  Physical as well as chemical methods of restraint are presented.  Common disease processes experienced by the dog and cat are outlined and nutrition is examined as it relates to both the healthy and ill pet.  Infectious, hormonal, traumatic, toxicological and nutritional problems include some of the disease processes covered.  Raising orphan puppies and kittens and proper vaccination procedures are taught.  Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 minimum grade of C-, VET 120 minimum grade of C-, BIO 171minimum grade of C-, restricted to VET majors. Offered fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 202) and the lab (VET 202 L) is required.

VET 204 VETERINARY CLINICAL LAB TECHNIQUES

This course examines blood, urine and feces for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Lectures will focus on the physiologic responses to disease and the effects of disease on measurable substances produced by the body.  The collection, storage and handling of laboratory specimens and general laboratory management procedures including safety and quality control will be discussed.  Laboratory sessions emphasize the performance of analytical procedures commonly used in veterinary medicine.  Less routine procedures will be demonstrated and/or discussed.Three credit hours. Prerequisites: BIO 171 (minimum C-); restricted to VET majors. Offered fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 204) and the lab (VET 204 L) is required.

VET 206 HANDLING AND CARE OF EXOTICS

This course is specifically designed to acquaint the student with the most common exotic pets.  Handling, husbandry and diseases are studied.  Techniques of immobilization and obtaining laboratory samples are demonstrated.  Experiences may occur at various locations with birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals. Travel time to and from off-campus activities is required. Two credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 with a minimum grade of C-, BIO 171 with a minimum grade of C-, restricted to VET majors. Offered spring semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 206) and the lab (VET 206 L) is required.

VET 208 VETERINARY DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING

Topics include the theory of x-ray production and the x-ray machine as well as the practical aspects of producing diagnostic radiographs.  Emphasis will be placed on the production of high quality diagnostic images by correcting common problems of technique and positioning. Students will have experience exposing, processing, and handling of radiographic films while practicing NYS Radiation Safety regulations.  The students will also gain experience with contrast media and special techniques, the production and interpretation of electrocardiograms (ECG), and the role of ultrasonography in veterinary medicine.  Two credit hours. Prerequisites:  VET 100 minimum grade C-, BIO 171 minimum grade C-. Restricted to Vet majors. Offered fall semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 208) and the lab (VET 208 L) is required.

VET 222 FARM ANIMAL RESTRAINT, DISEASES, AND NUTRITION

This course is comprised of both a lecture and laboratory portion.  In the lecture, the states of wellness and disease of large animals will be presented in regards to nutrition, anatomy and physiology, treatment, and prevention and control. The course will explore reproductive physiology and management, herd management, and the husbandry of equine, bovine, porcine and small ruminants. Common procedures and vaccination protocols of large animals will be presented in class and practiced in lab. Additional student time and assignments will be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 minimum grade C-, BIO 171 minimum grade C-. Restricted to Vet majors. Note:  Registration for both the lecture (Vet222) and the lab (Vet 222L) is required. Offered spring semester.

VET 224 SURGICAL NURSING AND ANESTHESIOLOGY

The student becomes familiar with surgical theory and techniques. Topics include pre-operative theory and post-operative patient care, aseptic technique and materials and instruments used in various surgical procedures. Different types of sterilization processes and the care of surgical instruments are practiced. Anesthesiology includes the actions and uses of pre-anesthetic drugs as well as that of intravenous, intramuscular and inhalation anesthetics. Special emphasis is placed on monitoring the patient while under any type of anesthesia. Additional student time and assignments will be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 202, VET 204, and VET 230. Offered spring semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 224) and the lab (VET 224 L) is required.

VET 226 VETERINARY PRACTICE MANAGEMENT

The veterinary hospital is seen as both a medical and business facility.  Emphasis is on the pivotal role which the veterinary technician can perform.  Topics include human relations both with clients and other staff, basic business principles, medical records, financial transactions, ordering and inventory, supervising and hospitalized animal health care.  Computerization and its use in the veterinary office are investigated. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 (minimum C-); Restricted to VET majors. Offered spring semester.

VET 228 GROSS AND CLINICAL PATHOLOGY

The place of necropsy as a learning experience is explained.  Proper techniques for small animal and avian species are demonstrated and other species are illustrated.  Laboratory exercises with exotic species occur as the opportunities exist. Additional student time and assignments may be required outside of scheduled class and laboratory hours. One credit hour. Prerequisites: VET 100 and BIO 171 (minimum C-); restricted to VET majors. Offered spring semester. Note: Registration for both the lecture (VET 228) and the lab (VET 228 L) is required.

VET 230 PHARMACY AND PHARMACOLOGY

The student becomes familiar with the major drugs used in veterinary medicine. Pharmacy covers maintenance and inventory. Pharmacology is intended to acquaint the student with fundamental knowledge of the mechanism of action, the dosage, the routes of administration and the toxic effects of various groups of veterinary-related drugs. Conversion of weights and the calculation of various drug dosages are practiced, as well as fluid therapy and blood transfusion dynamics and calculations. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: MAT 112 or higher with a minimum grade C, BIO171 minimum grade C- , CHE 145. Offered fall semester.

VET 232 HORSE AND STABLE MANAGEMENT

Students will learn how to care for the horse in the barn including feeding, grooming, and cleaning stalls. Students will learn about the expenses of horse ownership. Students will participate in different aspects of running a horse show including course design, setup and breakdown, secretarial duties and other areas as required. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 130 or permission of Veterinary Technology chair. Offered as needed.

VET 275 Veterinary Service Learning: Heifer International

This service learning course introduces the student to global problems of poverty and hunger.  The core of the course is an experiential Alternative Spring Break program at Heifer International’s Heifer Farm in Massachusetts.  The participants engage in a range of activities to challenge and strengthen problem-solving and communication skills.  Throughout the 5-day program, the students will experience lifestyles from around the world and engage in service work, community building, and hands-on learning activities focused on hunger, sustainable development and caring for the earth.  This course is scheduled over the Medaille College spring break (leave Sunday and return Friday) and includes travel time to and from Massachusetts.  Students will be responsible to pay a fee established by Heifer International. One or three credit hours. Prerequistes: None. Offered Spring semester.

VET 277 PRECEPTORSHIP II

Each student spends 90 hours in a small animal, mixed (small and large) animal or other veterinary practice or facility to gain practical experience in the areas of surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory and general veterinary facility operations.  The primary objective is to reinforce and expand upon learning concepts by participating in actual cases.  Students will be exposed to the role of Veterinary Medicine and its impact on Society as expressed in the Veterinary Technician Oath (Vet. Tech. Student Handbook). Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Restricted to VET majors. Offered fall and spring semesters. VET 277 has been identified as a U course in the EQUIP curriculum sequence. This course is designed to help students understand their academic discipline within the context of the broader community, region, and the world.  VTE 277 considers the potential of the discipline and its methodology to contribute to a civic and sustainable future.

VET 298 SPECIAL TOPIC IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.

VET 300 VETERINARY DENTISTRY: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES

The fundamentals of veterinary dentistry are presented through the use of lecture and hands-on instruction. Emphasis is on the role of the veterinary technician in a small animal practice in providing dental services and client education. In-depth study of the oral cavity is combined with practical and clinical applications to present-day treatments. Understanding of common dental disease and the role of the veterinary technician in its treatment and prevention is stressed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 224 or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 301 DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY

A detailed examination of the oral cavity will be presented through the use of dental radiography. Specialized radiographic equipment and supplies will be utilized. Techniques for patient positioning and radiographic exposure will be demonstrated and practiced by students during laboratory sessions. Common disease processes seen in veterinary practice will be highlighted. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 300. Offered as needed.

VET 320 ADVANCED LABORATORY ANIMAL SCIENCE

An in-depth exploration of the principles and practices of advanced laboratory animal science is presented through a research-based course. Students will collaborate in development of animal protocols and will be responsible for all aspects of the research plan, including experimental design, completion of necessary documentation, and implementation of the protocol and communication of the results. Specialized techniques will be examined, including immunology, molecular biology, genetic engineering and gnotobiology. Management issues, such as principles of supervision, cost analysis, facility security, government regulations and occupational health and safety, will be emphasized. Ethical issues related to animal research will be evaluated. Note: Animal care will require additional time besides scheduled class and laboratory hours. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 120; or licensure as a Veterinary Technician; or certification as a Laboratory Animal Technician or Laboratory Animal Technologist. Offered as needed.

VET 326 EQUINE NUTRITION AND PHYSIOLOGY

Basic anatomy and physiology of the equine digestive system and its relation to nutrition and disease states will be covered. Application of ration formulas will be applied to calculate nutritional requirements for different life stages. Evaluation of different feed sources and supplements will be addressed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 222. Offered as needed.

VET 335 INTRODUCTION TO EQUINE BEHAVIOR AND HANDLING

Equine communication will be covered relative to basic handling, training, and restraint. The behaviors used by horses to communicate will be explored and applied to improve equine/human communication. This study will encompass hands-on work with horses in which students will be required to apply the skills they have acquired in the classroom. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: none. Offered as needed.

VET 340 APPLIED ANIMAL BEHAVIOR FOR VETERINARY PRACTICE: PART I

This is a practical course geared to the veterinary professional who wishes to specialize in small animal behavior. A systematic approach is adopted, beginning with the study of normal behavior and followed by an investigation into canine and feline aggressive behavior. Components of a proper behavioral history and their relationship to approaching behavioral problems are stressed. Case studies will be integrated into classroom and clinical experiences. A survey of behavior problems in farm animals will be included. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 and VET 230; or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 345 INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL REHABILITATION

This course focuses on an introduction to the newly evolving field of animal rehabilitation. Topics will include common orthopedic and neurological conditions and their appropriate modalities. Laws, certification standards and organizations promoting rehabilitation will be discussed, as well as the role of medications, neutraceuticals and nutrition. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: Restricted to VET majors; sophomore or higher standing. Offered as needed.

VET 355 PAIN MANAGEMENT IN ANIMALS

The issues and fundamentals of pain management are presented through the use of lecture, discussion and laboratory. An integrated approach is utilized, with emphasis on the ethics of pain management in animals. The physiology and biochemistry of pain and pain control will be explored. The role of the technician in detecting, assessing, reporting and managing pain is stressed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 120 and VET 230; or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 360 PATIENT MANAGEMENT AND THERAPEUTICS IN EMERGENCY MEDICINE AND CRITICAL CARE

This course is geared to the veterinary professional interested in emergency and critical care work. Requirements for specialization in the field will be discussed. The basic principles of emergency medicine including triage, all aspects of intravenous support, placement and care of monitoring devices as well as pain management will be covered. Basic nursing care of critical patients and interaction with clients of these patients will be included. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 224 or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 365 Feline Medicine

Emphasis is placed on common diseases and conditions of the cat. Infectious, parasitic, hormonal, allergic, traumatic, toxicological, congenital and acquired problems will be covered.  Diagnostic tests and treatments will be discussed, as well as specialized nursing care.  Preventative strategies will be discussed.  Importance of client education and concerns about zoonotic potential of diseases will be stressed.  Additional student time and assignments will be required outside of scheduled class hours. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 202, VET 230, restricted to VET majors. Offered as needed.

VET 375 Veterinary Service Learning: Heifer International

This service learning course introduces the student to global problems of poverty and hunger.  The core of the course is an experiential Alternative Spring Break program at Heifer International’s Heifer Farm in Massachusetts.  The participants engage in a range of activities to challenge and strengthen problem-solving and communication skills.  Throughout the 5-day program, the students will experience lifestyles from around the world and engage in service work, community building, and hands-on learning activities focused on hunger, sustainable development and caring for the earth.  This course is scheduled over the Medaille College spring break (leave Sunday and return Friday) and includes travel time to and from Massachusetts.  Students will be responsible to pay a fee established by Heifer International. One to three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 100 Introduction to Veterinary Technology. Offered Spring semester.

VET 398 SPECIAL TOPIC IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.

VET 400 ADVANCED DENTAL TECHNIQUES

Periodontal treatment as part of the basic dental prophylaxis is highlighted and practiced in hands-on demonstrations. Other advanced techniques for situations commonly encountered in small animal veterinary practice are studied. Emphasis is placed on the veterinary technicians’ understanding of dental lesions and pathology and their relationship to periodontic and exodontics. The enlarging role of the veterinary technician in providing these therapies is given prominence. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 301. Offered as needed.

VET 401 SPECIALIZATION IN VETERINARY DENTISTRY

This course focuses on the specialized areas of veterinary dentistry that are applicable to small animal species. Those interested in pursuing specialty certification or in employment with a veterinary dental specialist will find the presented material to be informative, useful and necessary. Topics covered will include endodontics, restorative dentistry, orthodontics and prosthodontics. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 400. Offered as needed.

VET 410 SMALL ANIMAL NUTRITION IN HEALTH AND DISEASE

This course is designed to provide veterinary technicians with advanced knowledge of nutritional management in small animals. Topics covered include neonatal, pediatric and geriatric nutrition in both health and disease states. Enteral and parenteral forms of nutrition will be explored. Students will be awarded the title of Veterinary Nutritional Advocate through Hill’s Pet Nutrition after completion of the course. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 202. Offered as needed.

VET 440 APPLIED ANIMAL BEHAVIOR FOR VETERINARY PRACTICE: PART II

A continuation of the specialized study into the common behavioral problems of dogs and cats. Treatments are presented that utilize principles of behavior modification and current behavioral pharmacology. Learning to “choose the right pet” is one example of the prevention recommendations that will be discussed. Case studies will be integrated into classroom and clinical experiences. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 340 or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 450 ANESTHESIA FOR CANINE AND FE­LINE HIGH RISK PATIENTS

An in-depth coverage of anesthetizing the problematic and medically challenging small animal patient. Pre-anesthesia planning, treating complicated physical conditions and choosing appropriate anesthetic protocols will be integrated. The role of analgesia during the four components of general anesthesia will be emphasized. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 224 or licensure as a Veterinary Technician. Offered as needed.

VET 460 SMALL ANIMAL EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE I

A body system approach is used in examining in depth the physiology, treatment and care of emergency and critical care cases seen in practice. Physical findings, appropriate diagnostic testing, initial treatment, appropriate monitoring and follow-up are emphasized. The cardiovascular, respiratory, neurologic and urinary systems are covered. Hematologic, toxicologic and thermal emergencies are also explored, as well as shock, anesthetic emergencies and allergic reactions, which are pansystemic. Clinical cases will be utilized in the course of study. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 360. Offered as needed.

VET 461 SMALL ANIMAL EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE II

This course is a continuation of the study of presentations in emergency and critical care by body system. Cases in the gastrointestinal tract, male and female reproductive systems, ocular, otic and dermatologic system will be examined. Emergencies involving the endocrine system and metabolic emergencies will be covered in detail. An overview of the approach to treating musculoskeletal and soft tissue injuries will be included. Case studies will again be utilized. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 460. Offered as needed.

VET 498 INDEPENDENT STUDY IN VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

Topic to be specified each semester course offered.