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VET Course Descriptions ALP-MOEnext

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VET 101 Introduction To Veterinary Technology

The student is introduced to the expectations of the Veterinary Technology Program, medical terminology and basic scientific and medical concepts. Emphasis will also be placed on definitions, abbreviations, and word elements used in the profession. Discussions are generated on career opportunities, the role of the veterinary technician in veterinary medicine, and the human-animal bond. The different classifications and breeds of companion and farm animals are studied. General principles of animal behavior, care, equipment and management are presented. Legal regulations on the county, state and federal levels are examined. Student safety will be addressed from a regulatory standpoint. Students will also be introduced to the concepts of euthanasia and necropsy. There will be a preliminary investigation of the concepts of health and disease.  Credit Hours: 4. Prerequisites: None. Offered as needed. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time.

VET 180 Care and Management of Exotic and Laboratory Animals

A general overview of exotic and laboratory animals is provided. Humane care, handling, management, technical procedures, and use of these animals are emphasized. Taxonomic classification and comparative anatomic and physiologic characteristics of common exotic and laboratory animals are presented. Laws, regulations, standards and organizations associated with laboratory animal science and the possession and management of exotic animals are discussed. Safety and ethical issues are addressed.  Number of Credits: 4, Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Offered as needed.

VET 203 Small Animal Diseases and Nutrition

Emphasis is placed on the dog and cat regarding proper restraint and care.  Physical as well as chemical methods of restraint are presented.  Common disease processes experienced by the dog and cat are outlined and nutrition is examined as it relates to both the healthy and ill pet.  Infectious, hormonal, traumatic, toxicological and nutritional problems include some of the disease processes covered.  Raising orphan puppies and kittens and proper vaccination procedures are taught. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 101, VET 180, and BIO 172.

VET 205 Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques

This course examines blood, urine, feces and cells for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Lectures will focus on the physiologic responses to disease and the effects of disease on measurable substances produced by the body. The collection, storage and handling of laboratory specimens and general laboratory management procedures, including safety and quality control, will be discussed. The common ectoparasites and endoparasites of pet, exotic and large animals are identified and their life history and pathogenesis are studied. Public health aspects are noted and methods of prevention and treatment are discussed. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.  Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time.

VET 207 Veterinary Clinical Laboratory Techniques

This course examines blood, urine, feces and cells for diagnostic and prognostic purposes.  Lectures will focus on the physiologic responses to disease and the effects of disease on measurable substances produced by the body.  The collection, storage and handling of laboratory specimens and general laboratory management procedures, including safety and quality control, will be discussed.  The common ectoparasites and endoparsites of pet, exotic and large animals are identified and their life history and pathogenesis are studied.  Public health aspects are noted and methods of prevention and treatment are discussed. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 101, VET 180, and BIO 172.

VET 209 Diagnostic Imaging

Topics include the theory of x-ray production as well as the practical aspects of taking radiographs.  Emphasis is on the diagnostic quality of radiographs and how to correct common problems.  Students will have experience in radiographic exposure, development and handling.  Proper positioning and restraint for various anatomical views are shown.  Use of contrast media and special techniques is mentioned.  Safety precautions and New York State regulations are emphasized.  The role of the electrocardiogram (ECG) in veterinary medicine is discussed.  Proper patient positioning and methods of restraint are taught.  The normal ECG tracing and common disease variations are studied. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 2303

VET 221 Pharmacy and Pharmacology

The student becomes familiar with the major drugs used in veterinary medicine. Pharmacology is intended to acquaint the student with fundamental knowledge of the mechanism of action, dosage, routes of administration and toxic effects of various groups of veterinary-related drugs. Conversion of weights, volumes and the calculation of drug doses are practiced.  Emphasis is placed on the role the veterinary technician plays in educating the client in the use of prescribed drugs in pets and production animals. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 203

VET 223 Farm Animal Restraint, Diseases and Nutrition

Physical and chemical restraint is demonstrated on the bovine, equine, caprine and ovine.  Common diseases and the significant role of nutrition in the farm animal are presented.  Miscellaneous procedures such as the physical exam, dentistry and diagnostic nerve blocks are shown.   Porcine assisting techniques are mentioned.  Regulatory medicine, vaccination protocols and methods of administering medications are taught. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 101 and BIO 172.

VET 225 Pain Management and Analgesia

The issues and fundamentals of pain management are presented through the use of lecture, discussion and laboratory.  An integrated approach is utilized, with emphasis on the ethics of pain management in animals.  The physiology and biochemistry of pain and pain control will be explored.  The role of the technician in detecting, assessing, reporting and managing pain is stressed. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 101, VET 180, and BIO 172.

VET 227 Surgical Nursing and Anesthesia

The student becomes familiar with surgical theory and techniques.  Topics include pre-operative theory and post operative patient care, aseptic technique and materials and instruments used in various surgical procedures.  Different types of sterilization processes and the care of surgical instruments are practiced.  Anesthesiology includes the actions and uses of pre-anesthetic drugs as well as that of intravenous, intramuscular and inhalation anesthetics.  Special emphasis is placed on monitoring the patient while under any type of anesthesia. Four credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 203 and VET 207.

VET 239 Veterinary Dentistry: Principles, Practices and Radiography

The fundamentals of veterinary dentistry are presented through the use of lecture and laboratory hands-on instruction.  Emphasis is on the role of the veterinary technician in a small animal practice in providing dental services and client education.  In-depth study of the oral cavity is combined with practical and clinical applications to present-day treatments and radiography.  Understanding of common dental disease and the role of the veterinary technician in its treatment and prevention is stressed.  Techniques for patent positioning and radiographic exposure will be covered. Three credit hours. Prerequisites: VET 227

VET 243 Small Animal Emergency and Critical Care

An overview approach in examining the physiology, treatment and care of emergency and critical care cases seen in practice.  Physical findings, appropriate diagnostic testing, initial treatment, appropriate monitoring and follow-up are emphasized.  All body systems are covered.  Hematologic, toxicologic and thermal emergencies are also explored, as well as shock, anesthetic emergencies and allergic reactions, which are pansystemic.  Clinical cases will be utilized in the course of study. Three credit hours Prerequisites: VET 227.

VET 249 Clinical Experiences I

Each student spends a minimum of 240 hours observing and performing the tasks of a Veterinary Technician at an animal facility in such areas as surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory and general facility operations.  The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases.  The student should become familiar with and appreciate the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Prerequisites: VET 101, BIO 172, and GEN 131. Three credit hours. Offered as needed. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time.

VET 250 Clinical Experiences II

Each student spends a minimum of 240 hours observing and performing the tasks of a Veterinary Technician at an animal facility in such areas as surgery, anesthesia, treatment, radiology, laboratory and general facility operations.  The primary objective is to introduce the concepts of veterinary medicine and the duties and responsibilities of a Veterinary Technician by seeing and participating in actual cases.  The student should become familiar with and appreciate the role of the Veterinary Technician in a practical, applied atmosphere. Prerequisites: VET 101, BIO 172, and GEN 131. Three credit hours. Offered as needed. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time.

VET 251 Clinical Case Study 1: Wellness and Preventative Medicine

This is the first course in a series of 7 Clinical Case Applications.  Health and wellness will be discussed from the perspective of preventive medicine.  The importance of medical history, physical examination and accurate medical record keeping will be stressed.  Wellness programs for dogs, cats, horses and ruminants will be described, including vaccination protocols, parasite prevention and control, grooming, dentistry, routine diagnostic procedures and surgeries, and behavior training.  The importance of nutrition in maintaining health will be discussed.  Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

 

VET 252 Clinical Case Study 2: Integument, Wound Healing and the Musculoskeletal System

This is the second course in a series of 7 Clinical Case Applications. This course covers the veterinary technician’s role in managing acute and chronic integument and musculoskeletal system abnormalities including wound care and healing in large and small animals. Case studies will incorporate the techniques and skills required for the Veterinary Technician to perform relevant procedures as determined by the Veterinarian. Basic principles of radiography will be explored emphasizing radiology of the skeletal system. Appropriate pharmacologic agents and alternative medicine treatment modalities for the musculoskeletal system and integument will be covered. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Anesthesia will be introduced, with emphasis on inhalant anesthetics and anesthetics equipment. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

VET 253 Clinical Case Study 3: Gastrointestinal System

This is the third course in a series of 7 Clinical Case Applications. This course will cover diseases, therapies and diagnostics of the gastrointestinal system of common domestic species. Particular attention will be placed on the role of the veterinary technician in the procedures for the diagnosis and treatments for gastrointestinal disorders. The physiology and management of pain will be introduced, differentiating general and local anestic agents, indications, and techniques. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

VET 254 Clinical Case Study 4: Cardiology, Respiration, and Hematology

A continuation of the clinical case series of courses. This course specifically encompasses the Cardiac, Respiratory and Hematology areas of importance to Veterinary Medicine and the role of the Veterinary Technician.  Case Studies will incorporate the techniques and skills required for the Veterinary Technician to perform relevant procedures as determined by the Veterinarian.  An understanding of the common cardiac, respiratory and hematologic diseases will be augmented by an understanding of the medications and protocols necessary for appropriate treatment. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

VET 255 Clinical Case Study 5: Reproduction, Urogenital, Urinary, and Endocrinology

A continuation of the Clinical Case series of courses. This course will cover the normal and abnormal reproduction of companion and large animals and diagnostics of the reproductive systems. Normal and abnormal urogenital conditions, endocrine diseases and their diagnostics are examined. Particular attention will be placed on the role of the Veterinary Technician in the diagnosis and treatments of the reproductive, urologic and endocrine systems. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time. Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

VET 256 Case Study 6: Neurology, Special Senses and Immunology

A continuation of the clinical case series of courses. This course surveys the anatomy and physiology of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems. Common diseases are covered along with the physical examination and relevant diagnostic procedures for discovering the causes. Drugs affecting the Nervous System are categorized and studied for use, effect and efficacy. Note: There may be one or two mandatory wet labs, associated with this course that falls outside of normal class meeting time.  Prerequisites: VET 101 Introduction to Veterinary Technology, BIO 172 Comparative Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Science, GEN 131 Critical Thinking and Health Sciences. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.

VET 260 (1 credit), VET 261 (2 credits), VET 262 (1 credit), VET 263 (2 credits) Clinical Experience

To complete the AAS Veterinary Technology degree program all procedures on the required essential task checklist must be performed satisfactorily.  Failure to satisfactorily complete the requirements described will result in the AAS degree not being awarded, regardless of numerical grades in lectures.  It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that the instructor/supervisor observes and/or evaluates each item and documents the satisfactory completion of all required essential tasks. Essential tasks required for accredited AVMA veterinary technology programs are determined by their committee on veterinary technician education activities.  These tasks are reviewed and revised on a yearly basis. Standard criteria for performing the required essential tasks are developed according to established and present-day principles of veterinary medicine.  VET 260-263 Clinical Experiences will be reviewed and updated yearly to reflect any changes in AVMA requirements and constantly evolving principles of veterinary medicine. Please note: Clinical Experiences VET 260, VET 261, VET 262, and VET 263 all have the same course description; the clinical experience is divided into multiple courses in order to accommodate scheduling. Prerequisites: Permission of Vet Tech Chair or designee.

VET 270 Veterinary Technology Capstone

The focus of this capstone course is the incorporation of students' hands-on clinical experiences with prior clinical case coursework. Students will have the opportunity to select case studies from actual medical situations encountered during their 240 hour clinical rotations. Emphasis will be placed on the knowledge, role and responsibilities of a licensed veterinary technician. Any species suggested by students and approved by the instructor can be included as a basis for examination and study. Four credit hours. Offered as needed.